Etymology
Advertisement
confine (v.)

1520s, "to border on, have a common boundary," a sense now obsolete, from French confiner "to border; to shut up, enclose," which is perhaps from the noun confins (see confines) or from Medieval Latin confinare "border on; set bounds." Sense of "restrict within bounds, keep within limits" is from 1590s. Related: Confined; confining.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Tahoe 

Lake on the Nevada-California border, from Washo /da'aw/ "lake."

Related entries & more 
emarginate (adj.)

"having the margin or extremity notched," 1731 (implied in emarginated), from Latin emarginatus, past participle of emarginare, from assimilated form of ex- (see ex-) + margo "edge, brink, border, margin" (from PIE root *merg- "boundary, border"). Related: Emargination.

Related entries & more 
outskirt (n.)

"outer border, section or part that 'skirts' along the edge or boundary," 1590s, from out- + skirt (n.) in its secondary sense of "edge, border." Now only in plural, outskirts; originally in Spenser, and singular.

Related entries & more 
confines (n.)

c. 1400, "boundary, border, frontier, limit" (usually plural), from Old French confins "boundaries," from Medieval Latin confines "a border, boundary," from Latin confinium (plural confinia) "boundary, limit," from confine, neuter of confinis "bordering on, having the same boundaries," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + finis "an end" (see finish (v.)). As "the part of a territory which is near the border" (as in Dryden's "Betwixt the confines of the Night and Day") is from c. 1600.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
limbus (n.)

Latin, literally "edge, border" (see limb (n.2)). Used in English in various senses; in Medieval Latin the name of the region on the border of Hell, and thus sometimes used in very correct English for limbo (n.1).

Related entries & more 
matting (n.2)

"ornamental border of a picture," 1864 from verbal derivative of mat (n.2).

Related entries & more 
river-bank (n.)

"sloping edge or border of a river," 1560s, from river (n.) + bank (n.2).

Related entries & more 
list (n.2)

"a narrow strip," Old English liste "border, hem, edge, strip," from Proto-Germanic *liston (source also of Old High German lista "strip, border, list," Old Norse lista "border, selvage," German leiste), from PIE *leizd- "border, band" (see list (n.1)). The Germanic root also is the source of French liste, Italian lista. The word has had many technical senses in English, including "lobe of an ear" and "a stripe of color." This also is the list in archaic lists "place of combat" (late 14c.), from an earlier sense "boundary;" the fighting ground being originally at the boundary of fields.

Related entries & more 
marge (n.)

"edge, border," 1550s, now chiefly poetic, shortening of margin (n.), or from French marge.

Related entries & more 

Page 2