Etymology
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parboil (v.)

late 14c., parboilen, "to boil partially;" mid-15c., "to boil thoroughly," from Old French parboillir "to boil thoroughly," from Medieval Latin perbullire "to boil thoroughly," from Latin per "through, thoroughly" (see per (prep.)) + bullire "to boil" (see boil (v.)). The etymological sense is extinct in English; the surviving meaning "boil partially" is by mistaken association of the prefix with part. Related: Parboiled; parboiling.

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budge (v.)

1580s (intransitive) "to move, stir, change position, give way a little;" 1590s (transitive) "change the position of;" from French bougier "to move, stir" (Modern French bouger), from Vulgar Latin *bullicare "to bubble, boil" (hence, "to be in motion"), from Latin bullire "to boil" (see boil (v.)). Compare Spanish bullir "to move about, bustle;" Portuguese bulir "to move a thing from its place." In 16c. canting slang, "a general verb of action, usually stealthy action" (Farmer, "Musa Pedestris," who gives among his examples budge a beak "to give the constable the slip," budge out or off "to sneak off"). Related: Budged; budging.

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seethe (v.)

Middle English sethen, from Old English seoþan "to boil, be heated to the boiling point, prepare (food) by boiling," also figurative, "be troubled in mind, brood" (class II strong verb; past tense seaþ, past participle soden), from Proto-Germanic *seuthan (source also of Old Norse sjoða, Old Frisian siatha, Dutch zieden, Old High German siodan, German sieden "to seethe"), from PIE root *seut- "to seethe, boil."

Driven out of its literal meaning by boil (v.); it survives largely in metaphoric extensions. Of a liquid, "to rise, surge, or foam" without reference to heat, from 1530s. Figurative use, of persons or populations, "to be in a state of inward agitation" is recorded from 1580s (implied in seething). It had transitive figurative uses in Old English, such as "to try by fire, to afflict with cares, be tossed about as in turbulent water." Now conjugated as a weak verb, its old past participle sodden (q.v.) is no longer felt as connected.

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effervesce (v.)
1702, from Latin effervescere "to boil up, boil over," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fervescere "begin to boil," from fervere "be hot, boil" (from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn"). Related: Effervesced; effervescing.
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effervescent (adj.)
1680s, from Latin effervescentem (nominative effervescens), present participle of effervescere "to boil up, boil over," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fervescere "begin to boil," from fervere "be hot, boil" (from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn"). Figurative meaning "exuberant" is from 1833.
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effervescence (n.)
1650s, "the action of boiling up," from French effervescence (1640s), from Latin effervescentem, present participle of effervescere "to boil up, boil over," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fervescere "begin to boil," from fervere "be hot, boil" (from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn"). Figurative sense of "liveliness" is from 1748. Related: Effervescency.
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fervid (adj.)
1590s, "burning, glowing, hot," from Latin fervidus "glowing, burning; vehement, fervid," from fervere "to boil, glow" (from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn"). Figurative sense of "impassioned" is from 1650s. Related: Fervidly; fervidness.
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furuncle (n.)
"a boil, circumscribed inflammation on the skin," 1670s, from Latin furunculus, "a boil, burning sore," also "petty thief, pilferer," diminutive of fur "thief" (see furtive). Related: Furuncular; furunculous.
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eczema (n.)
1753, from Greek ekzema, literally "something thrown out by heat," from ekzein "to boil over, break out," from ek "out" (see ex-) + zein "to boil," from PIE root *yes- "to boil, foam, bubble" (see yeast). Said to have been the name given by ancient physicians to "any fiery pustule on the skin" [Chambers' "Cyclopaedia"].
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fervor (n.)
mid-14c., "warmth or glow of feeling," from Old French fervor "heat; enthusiasm, ardor, passion" (12c., Modern French ferveur), from Latin fervor "a boiling, violent heat; passion, ardor, fury," from fervere "to boil; be hot" (from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn").
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