Etymology
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lash (v.2)

"to tie or bind," as with rope or cord, 1620s, originally nautical, from French lachier, from Old French lacier "to lace on, fasten with laces; entrap, ensnare" (see lace (v.)). Related: Lashed; lashing.

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unlace (v.)

c. 1300, from un- (2) "opposite of" + lace (v.). Related: Unlaced; unlacing.

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laceman (n.)

dealer in laces, 1660s, from lace (n.) + man.

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needlepoint (n.)

c. 1700, "the point of a needle;" 1865, "point lace made with the needle," 1865, from needle (n.) + point (n.).

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mantilla (n.)

woman's head-covering, often of lace, which falls down upon the shoulders and may be used as a veil, 1717, from Spanish mantilla, diminutive of manta "blanket," from Late Latin mantum "cloak," from Latin mantellum "cloak" (see mantle (n.)).

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lanyard (n.)

also laniard, "small rope or cord used aboard ships," alternative spelling (influenced by nautical yard (2) "long beam used to support a sail") of Middle English lainer, "thong for fastening parts of armor or clothing" (late 14c.), from Old French laniere "thong, lash, strap of leather," from lasniere (12c., from lasne "strap, thong"), apparently altered (by metathesis and influence of Old French las "lace") from nasliere (nasle), from Frankish *nastila or some other Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *nastila- (source also of Old High German, Old Saxon nestila "lace, strap, band," German nestel "string, lace, strap"), from PIE root *ned- "to knot."

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blond (n.)

c. 1755 of a type of lace (originally unbleached silk, hence the name); 1822 of persons with blond hair and fair complexions; from blond (adj.).

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spool (n.)

early 14c., "wheel for winding thread upon," from Old North French spole, espole "a spool" (13c.), from Middle Dutch spoele "a spool," from Proto-Germanic *spolon (source also of Norwegian and Swedish spole, Old High German spuola, German Spule "a spool, bobbin"), from PIE root *spel- (1) "to cleave, split" (see spoil (v.)).

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strait-laced (adj.)

early 15c., of stays or bodices, "made close and tight;" see strait (adj.) + lace (v.). Figurative sense of "over-precise, prudish, strict in manners or morals" is from 1550s.

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necklace (n.)

"flexible ornament worn round the neck," 1580s, from neck (n.) + lace (n.) in the sense of "cord, string." As the name of a South African form of lynching, from 1985. Related: Necklaced.

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