Etymology
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boat-house (n.)
"shed for storing boats and protecting them from weather," 1722, from boat (n.) + house (n.).
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boardwalk (n.)
"walkway made of boards," 1864, American English, from board (n.1) + walk (n.). As a seaside attraction from 1881, first in reference to Atlantic City, N.J.
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boarding (n.)
1530s, "supplying of meals, food and lodging," from board (n.1) in its extended sense of "food" (via notion of "table"). Boarding-school is from 1670s; boarding-house attested from 1728.
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finger-board (n.)
of a violin, etc., 1670s, from finger (n.) + board (n.1).
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long-boat (n.)
longest and strongest boat on a sailing ship, 1510s, from long (adj.) + boat (n.).
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boar (n.)
Old English bar "boar, uncastrated male swine," from Proto-Germanic *bairaz (source also of Old Saxon ber, Dutch beer, Old High German ber "a boar"), which is of unknown origin with no cognates outside West Germanic.

Originally of either wild or tame animals; wild boar is from c. 1200. The chase of the wild boar was considered one of the most exciting sports. Applied by c. 1300 to persons of boar-like character.
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boat (n.)

"small open vessel (smaller than a ship) used to cross waters, propelled by oars, a sail, or (later) an engine," Old English bat, from Proto-Germanic *bait- (source also of Old Norse batr, Dutch boot, German Boot), possibly from PIE root *bheid- "to split," if the notion is of making a boat by hollowing out a tree trunk or from split planking. Or it may be an extension of the name for some part of a ship.

French bateau "boat" is from Old English or Norse. Spanish batel, Italian battello, Medieval Latin batellus likewise probably are from Germanic. Of serving vessels resembling a boat, by 1680s. The image of being in the same boat "subject to similar challenges and difficulties" is by 1580s; to rock the boat "disturb stability" is from 1914.

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story-board (n.)
also storyboard, 1941, from story (n.1) + board (n.1).
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boarder (n.)
1520s, "one who has food and/or lodging at the house of another," agent noun from board (v.) in the "be supplied with food" sense. Nautical meaning "one who boards (an enemy's) ship" to attack it is from 1769, from a verbal sense derived from board (n.2).
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boastful (adj.)
"given to boasting," early 14c., from boast (n.) + -ful. Related: Boastfully; boastfulness.
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