Etymology
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blood-stained (adj.)
"stained with blood; guilty of slaughter," 1590s, from blood (n.) + past participle of stain (v.).
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blood-letting (n.)
also bloodletting, early 13c., blod letunge, from blood (n.) + letting. Hyphenated from 17c., one word from mid-19c. Old English had blodlæte "blood-letting," from blodlætan "to bleed, let blood."
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blood-stream (n.)
also bloodstream, 1847, from blood (n.) + stream (n.).
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withe (n.)

Old English wiððe "twisted cord, tough, flexible twig used for binding, especially a willow twig," from PIE *withjon-, from root *wei- "to turn, twist."

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sprig (n.)
"shoot, twig or spray of a plant, shrub," c. 1400, probably related to Old English spræc "shoot, twig," a word of obscure origin.
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edamame (n.)

fresh green soya beans in the pod, boiled, seasoned, and served as an appetizer, 1951, from Japanese, said to mean literally "twig bean."

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azotemia (n.)
"presence of excess nitrogen in the blood," 1894, also azotaemia, from azote "nitrogen" (see azo-) + -emia "blood." Related: Azotemic.
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bloodthirsty (adj.)
also blood-thirsty, "eager to shed blood," 1530s (Coverdale, Psalms xxv.9), from blood (n.) + thirsty (adj.). Ancient Greek had a similar image in haimodipsos. Related: Bloodthirstiness.
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sanguineous (adj.)

1510s, "of the color of blood, of a deep red color;" 1640s, "of or pertaining to blood," from Latin sanguineus "of blood, bloody," from sanguin-, stem of sanguis (see sanguinary).

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pureblood (adj.)

also pure-blood, "of unmixed inheritance or ancestry," 1851, from pure blood (n.), attested from 1751 in reference to breeding, from pure (adj.), which is attested from late 15c. in reference to unmixed descent or lineage, + blood (n.). As a noun meaning "a pure-blood animal" from 1882.

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