Etymology
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blood-red (adj.)
"blood-colored," Old English blodread; see blood (n.) + red (adj.1). Compare Dutch bloedrood, German blutroth, Old Norse bloðrauðr.
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blood-stained (adj.)
"stained with blood; guilty of slaughter," 1590s, from blood (n.) + past participle of stain (v.).
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blood-letting (n.)
also bloodletting, early 13c., blod letunge, from blood (n.) + letting. Hyphenated from 17c., one word from mid-19c. Old English had blodlæte "blood-letting," from blodlætan "to bleed, let blood."
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blood-stream (n.)
also bloodstream, 1847, from blood (n.) + stream (n.).
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muss (v.)

"to make untidy, put in a state of disorder," 1837, American English, probably a variant of mess in its sense of "to disorder." It was attested earlier (1830) as a noun meaning "disturbance, state of confusion." Related: Mussed; mussing.

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azotemia (n.)
"presence of excess nitrogen in the blood," 1894, also azotaemia, from azote "nitrogen" (see azo-) + -emia "blood." Related: Azotemic.
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sanguineous (adj.)

1510s, "of the color of blood, of a deep red color;" 1640s, "of or pertaining to blood," from Latin sanguineus "of blood, bloody," from sanguin-, stem of sanguis (see sanguinary).

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tumble (n.)
"accidental fall," 1716, from tumble (v.). Earlier as "disorder, confusion" (1630s).
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shambolic (adj.)

"chaotic, disorderly," 1961, apparently from shamble in the sense "disorder" (see shambles), perhaps on model of symbolic.

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bloodthirsty (adj.)
also blood-thirsty, "eager to shed blood," 1530s (Coverdale, Psalms xxv.9), from blood (n.) + thirsty (adj.). Ancient Greek had a similar image in haimodipsos. Related: Bloodthirstiness.
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