Etymology
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blazon (v.)
1560s, "to depict or paint (armorial bearings)," from blazon (n.) or else from French blasonner, from the noun in French. Earlier as "to set forth decriptively" (1510s); especially "to vaunt or boast" (1530s); in this use probably from or influenced by blaze (v.2).
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blizzard (n.)
"strong, sustained storm of wind and cold, and dry, driving snow," 1859, origin obscure (perhaps somehow connected with blaze (n.1), and compare blazer); it came into general use in the U.S. in this sense in the hard winter of 1880-81. OED says it probably is "more or less onomatopœic," and adds "there is nothing to indicate a French origin." Before that it typically meant "a violent blow," also "hail of gunfire" in American English from 1829, and blizz "violent rainstorm" is attested from 1770. The winter storm sense perhaps is originally a colloquial figurative use in the Upper Midwest of the U.S.
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*bhle- 
bhlē-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to blow," possibly a variant of PIE root *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell."

It forms all or part of: afflatus; bladder; blase; blast; blather; blaze (v.2) "make public;" blow (v.1) "move air;" conflate; deflate; flageolet; flatulent; flatus; flavor; inflate; inflation; insufflation; isinglass; souffle.
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badger (n.)

type of low, nocturnal, burrowing, carnivorous animal, 1520s, perhaps from bage "badge" (see badge) + reduced form of -ard "one who carries some action or possesses some quality," suffix related to Middle High German -hart "bold" (see -ard). If so, the central notion is the badge-like white blaze on the animal's forehead (as in French blaireau "badger," from Old French blarel, from bler "marked with a white spot;" also obsolete Middle English bauson "badger," from Old French bauzan, literally "black-and-white spotted"). But blaze (n.2) was the usual word for this.

An Old English name for the creature was the Celtic borrowing brock; also græg (Middle English grei, grey). In American English, the nickname of inhabitants or natives of Wisconsin by 1833.

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*bhel- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to shine, flash, burn," also "shining white" and forming words for bright colors.

It forms all or part of: beluga; Beltane; black; blancmange; blanch; blank; blanket; blaze (n.1) "bright flame, fire;" bleach; bleak; blemish; blench; blende; blend; blind; blindfold; blitzkrieg; blond; blue (adj.1); blush; conflagration; deflagration; effulgence; effulgent; flagrant; flambe; flambeau; flamboyant; flame; flamingo; flammable; Flavian; Flavius; fulgent; fulminate; inflame; inflammable; phlegm; phlegmatic; phlogiston; phlox; purblind; refulgent; riboflavin.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit bhrajate "shines;" Greek phlegein "to burn;" Latin flamma "flame," fulmen "lightning," fulgere "to shine, flash," flagrare "to burn, blaze, glow;" Old Church Slavonic belu "white;" Lithuanian balnas "pale."

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conflagrate (v.)

1650s, "to catch fire," from Latin conflagratus, past participle of conflagrare "to burn, consume," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see con-), + flagrare "to burn, blaze, glow" (from PIE root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn"). Transitive meaning "to set on fire" is from 1835.

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deflagration (n.)

"a setting on fire," c. 1600, from Latin deflagrationem (nominative deflagratio) "a burning up, conflagration," noun of action from past-participle stem of deflagrare, from de (see de-) + flagrare "to burn, blaze, glow," from PIE root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn." Related: Deflagrate, deflagrating.

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conflagration (n.)

1550s, "a destructive fire;" 1650s, "a large fire, the burning of a large mass of combustibles," from French conflagration (16c.) or directly from Latin conflagrationem (nominative conflagratio), noun of action from past-participle stem of conflagrare "to burn up," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see con-), + flagrare "to burn, blaze, glow" (from PIE root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn").

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backlog (n.)

also back-log, 1680s, "large log placed at the back of a fire" to keep the blaze going and concentrate the heat; see back (adj.) + log (n.1). The figurative sense of "something stored up for later use" is attested by 1883, but this and the meaning "arrears of unfulfilled orders" (1932) might be from, or suggested by, log (n.2).

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flambe (adj.)

1869, of certain types of porcelain, 1914 as a term in cookery, from French flambé, past participle of flamber "to singe, blaze" (16c.), from Old French flambe "a flame" (from Latin flamma "flame, blazing fire," from PIE root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn"). Middle English had flame (v.) in cookery sense "baste (a roast) with hot grease, to baste; to glaze (pastry)."

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