Etymology
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bindle (n.)

"tramp's bundle," 1900, perhaps from bundle (n.) or Scottish dialectal bindle "cord or rope to bind things." Related: Bindlestiff "tramp who carries a bindle" (1901).

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binnacle (n.)

"wooden box for a ship's compass," 1738, corruption of bittacle (1620s), which is probably from Spanish bitacula or Portuguese bitacola, both from Latin habitaculum "little dwelling place," from habitare "to inhabit" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive").

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binoculars (n.)

1866; see binocular. Earlier binocle (1690s).

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bindery (n.)

"place where books are bound," 1793, American English; see bind (v.) + -ery.

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bingo (n.)

lotto-like game of chance, 1924; there are many theories about its origin, none satisfying; the most likely is bingo! as an exclamation of sudden realization or surprise (attested from 1923).

Uncertain connection to the slang word for "brandy" (1690s), attested as "liquor" in American English from 1861. Thomas Chandler Haliburton ("Sam Slick") in "The Americans at Home" (1854) recounts a story of a drinking game in which the children's song about the farmer's dog was sung and when it came time to spell out the name, every participant had to take a letter in turn, and anyone who missed or flubbed had to drink.

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Bing (adj.)

in reference to a a dark red type of cherry widely grown in the U.S., 1889, said to have been developed 1870s and named for Ah Bing, Chinese orchard foreman for Oregon fruit-grower Seth Lewelling. 

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binocular (adj.)

1738, "involving both eyes," earlier "having two eyes" (1713), from French binoculaire, from Latin bini "two by two, twofold, two apiece" (see binary) + ocularis "of the eye," from oculus "eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see"). The double-tubed telescopic instrument (1871, short for binocular glass) earlier was called a binocle. Related: Binocularity; binocularly.

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binder (n.)

Old English bindere "one who binds," agent noun from bind (v.). Of various objects or products that bind, from early 16c.

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bine (n.)

"climbing stem, flexible shoot of a shrub," 1727, from a dialectal form of bind (n.).

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binate (adj.)

"double, growing in pairs," 1807, from Latin bini "two by two, twofold, two apiece" (see binary) + -ate (2). Used especially in botany.

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