Etymology
Advertisement
Stanford-Binet 

intelligence test, first published 1916 as a revision and extension of the Binet-Simon intelligence tests, from Stanford University (California, U.S.) + the name of French psychologist Alfred Binet, who devised the attempt at a scientific measurement of intelligence.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
binaural (adj.)
"pertaining to both ears," 1857, from Latin bini "twofold, two apiece" (see binary) + aural. In reference to sound reproduction from electronic recordings, 1933.
Related entries & more 
binding (n.)
mid-13c., "act or action of securing, uniting, etc.," verbal noun from bind (v.). Meaning "thing that binds" is from c. 1300; "state of being bound" is from late 14c. Meaning "covering of a book" is recorded from 1640s.
Related entries & more 
bindle (n.)
"tramp's bundle," 1900, perhaps from bundle (n.) or Scottish dialectal bindle "cord or rope to bind things." Related: Bindlestiff "tramp who carries a bindle" (1901).
Related entries & more 
binnacle (n.)
"wooden box for a ship's compass," 1738, corruption of bittacle (1620s), which is probably from Spanish bitacula or Portuguese bitacola, both from Latin habitaculum "little dwelling place," from habitare "to inhabit" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive").
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
binoculars (n.)
1866; see binocular. Earlier binocle (1690s).
Related entries & more 
bindery (n.)
"place where books are bound," 1793, American English; see bind (v.) + -ery.
Related entries & more 
Bing (adj.)

in reference to a a dark red type of cherry widely grown in the U.S., 1889, said to have been developed 1870s and named for Ah Bing, Chinese orchard foreman for Oregon fruit-grower Seth Lewelling. 

Related entries & more 
bingo (n.)
lotto-like game of chance, 1924; many theories about its origin, none satisfying; the most likely is bingo! as an exclamation of sudden realization or surprise (attested from 1923). Uncertain connection to the slang word for "brandy" (1690s); attested as "liquor" in American English from 1861. Thomas Chandler Haliburton ("Sam Slick") in "The Americans at Home" (1854) recounts a story of a drinking game in which the children's song about the farmer's dog was sung and when it came time to spell out the name, every participant had to take a letter in turn, and anyone who missed or flubbed had to drink.
Related entries & more 
binder (n.)
Old English bindere "one who binds," agent noun from bind (v.). Of various objects or products that bind, from early 16c.
Related entries & more 

Page 2