Etymology
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tocsin (n.)

"alarm bell," 1580s, from French toquassen "an alarm bell, the ringing of an alarm bell" (late 14c.), from Old Provençal tocasenh, from tocar "to strike" (from Vulgar Latin *toccare "strike a bell;" see touch (v.)) + senh "bell, bell note," from Late Latin signum "bell, ringing of a bell," in Latin "identifying mark, sign" (see sign (n.)). The current English spelling is from 1794, adopted from modern French.

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cloche (n.)

type of bell-jar, 1882, from French cloche "bell, bell glass" (12c.), from Late Latin clocca "bell" (see clock (n.1)). As a type of women's hat, recorded from 1907, so called from its shape.

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bluebell (n.)

also blue-bell, popular name of various plants with flowers blue and more or less bell-shaped, 1570s, from blue (adj.1) + bell (n.).

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bong (n.1)

bell-sound, 1918, imitative.

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bellhop (n.)

also bell-hop, "attendant in a hotel who carries guests' luggage and performs other services," by 1906, American English, shortening of slang bellhopper (1899), from bell (n.) + hop (v.). The notion is one who "hops" into action when the bell is rung.

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bellwether (n.)

also bell-wether, "lead sheep (on whose neck a bell was hung) of a domesticated flock," mid-14c. (late 13c. in Anglo-Latin; late 12c. as a surname), from bell (n.) + wether. The figurative sense of "chief, leader" is attested from mid-14c.

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clock (n.2)

"ornament pattern on a stocking," 1520s, probably identical with clock (n.1) in its older sense and meaning "bell-shaped ornament," though clock seems never to have been used for "bell" in English. Related: Clocked; clock-stocking.

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ding-dong 

imitative of the sound of a bell, 1550s. As a verb from 1650s.

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dong (v.)

"to sound a large bell," 1580s, imitative. Related: Donged; donging.

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knell (v.)

Old English cnyllan "to toll a bell; strike, knock," cognate with Middle High German erknellen "to resound," Old Norse knylla "to beat, thrash;" probably imitative. Intransitive sense, in reference to a bell, is from late 14c. Related: Knelled; knelling.

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