Etymology
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bitheism (n.)
"belief in two gods" (typically a good and an evil one), 1857, from bi- "two" + -theism.
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incredible (adj.)
early 15c., "unbelievable, surpassing belief as to what is possible," from Latin incredibilis "not to be believed, extraordinary," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + credibilis "worthy of belief" (see credible). Used c. 1400 in a now-extinct sense of "unbelieving, incredulous." Related: Incredibly; incredibility.
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Godism (n.)
contemptuous term for "belief in God," 1891, from God + -ism.
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thanatism (n.)
belief that at death the soul ceases to exist, 1900, from thanato- + -ism.
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ditheism (n.)

"belief in the existence of two supreme gods, religious dualism," 1670s, from di- (1) + -theism. Related: Ditheist; ditheistic.

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creed (n.)

Old English creda "article or statement of Christian belief, confession of faith," from Latin credo "I believe" (see credo). Broadening 17c. to mean "a statement of belief on any subject." Meaning "what is believed, accepted doctrine" is from 1610s. Related: Creedal.

A Creed, or Rule of Faith, or Symbol, is a confession of faith for public use, or a form of words setting forth with authority certain articles of belief, which are regarded by the framers as necessary for salvation, or at least for the well-being of the Christian Church. [Philip Schaff, "The Creeds of Christendom," 1877]
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millennialism (n.)

1906, "millenarianism, belief in the coming or presence of the (Christian) millennium," from millennial + -ism. Related: Millennialist.

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antitheism (n.)
also anti-theism, "opposition to theism; opposition to belief in God or gods," 1788; see anti- + theism.
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credulity (n.)

early 15c., "faith, belief," from Old French credulité (12c.), from Latin credulitatem (nominative credulitas) "easiness of belief, rash confidence," noun of quality from credulus "that easily believes, trustful," from credere "to believe" (see credo). Meaning "a weak or ignorant disregard of the importance of evidence, a disposition too ready to believe," especially absurd or impossible things, is from 1540s.

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theism (n.)

1670s, "belief in a deity or deities," (as opposed to atheism); by 1711 as "belief in one god" (as opposed to polytheism); by 1714 as "belief in the existence of God as creator and ruler of the universe" (as opposed to deism), the usual modern sense; see theist + -ism.

Theism assumes a living relation of God to his creatures, but does not define it. It differs from deism in that the latter is negative and involves a denial of revelation, while the former is affirmative, and underlies Christianity. One may be a theist and not be a Christian, but he cannot be a Christian and not be a theist. [Century Dictionary]
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