Etymology
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antecede (v.)
"come before in time, place, or order," early 15c. (implied in anteceding), from Latin antecedere "go before," from ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + cedere "to yield" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Related: Anteceded; anteceding.
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precede (v.)

early 15c., preceden, "lead the way; occur or exist before, go before in order of time," from Old French preceder and directly from Latin praecedere "to go before," from prae "before" (see pre-) + cedere "to go" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Meaning "to walk in front of" is late 15c.; that of "to go before in rank or importance" is attested from mid-15c. Related: Preceded; preceding.

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pre-exilic (adj.)

"existing or done before exile," 1884, chiefly in reference to Biblical writings supposed to date before the Jewish exile (586-537 B.C.E.), from pre- "before" + exile (n.) + -ic.

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pre-emption (n.)

also preemption, c. 1600, "a purchase by one before an opportunity is offered to others," originally as a right; literally "a purchasing before others," from pre- "before" + emption "purchase."

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protero- 
before vowels proter-, word-forming element meaning "former, earlier," from Greek proteros "before, former, anterior," from PIE *pro-, from root *per- (1) "forward" (hence "before, first").
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prenuptial (adj.)

"being or happening before marriage," 1826, from pre- "before" + nuptial. Prenuptial agreement is attested by 1833.

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predecease (v.)

"to die before, precede in dying," 1590s, from pre- "before" + decease (v.). Related: Predeceased; predeceasing.

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preverbal (adj.)

also pre-verbal, "prior to or present before the development of speech," 1931, from pre- "before" + verbal.

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prenatal (adj.)

"previous to birth, existing or occurring before birth," 1826, formed in English from pre- "before" + natal.

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preoccupancy (n.)

also pre-occupancy, "prior occupation, act of taking possession before another," 1734, from pre- "before" + occupancy.

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