Etymology
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Porifera (n.)

"the sponges," as an animal division or class, 1843, Modern Latin, literally "bearing pores," neuter plural of porifer, from Latin porus "pore, opening" (see pore (n.)) + -fer "bearing" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry"). So called for the numerous pores which perforate the body-wall. Related: Poriferal; poriferous.

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funded (adj.)
1776, "existing in the form of interest-bearing bonds," past-participle adjective from fund (v.).
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onymous (adj.)

"having or bearing a name," 1775, coined to provide an opposite to anonymous. Related: Onymously.

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homogamy (n.)
1805, "condition of bearing flowers that do not differ sexually," from homo- (1) "same" + -gamy.
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fennec (n.)
fox-like animal of Africa, 1790, from Arabic fenek, fanak "a name vaguely applied to various fur-bearing animals" [OED].
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Foraminifera 

order of Protozoa furnished with a shell, 1835, Modern Latin, neuter plural of foraminifer "bearing holes," from Latin foramen "hole, opening, orifice" (from PIE root *bhorh- "hole") + -fer "bearing," from ferre "to bear" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children"). So called because the shells usually are perforated by pores. Related: Foraminiferal.

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pseudonymous (adj.)

"bearing a false name," 1706, from Modern Latin pseudonymus, from Greek pseudōnymos "falsely named, falsely called" (see pseudonym). Related: Pseudonymously.

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Telamon 
in Greek mythology, father of Ajax, brother of Peleus, literally "the Bearer," from Greek telamon "broad strap for bearing something."
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chromatophore (n.)

"pigment cell in an animal," 1864, from chromato- + Greek -phoros "bearing, bearer," from pherein "to carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry"). Related: Chromatophorous.

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multifloral (adj.)

in botany, "bearing many (more than three) flowers," 1834, from Late Latin multiflorus "many-flowered" (see multiflora) + -al (1).

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