Etymology
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sicken (v.)
c. 1200, "to become ill," from sick (adj.) + -en (1). Transitive sense of "to make sick" is recorded from 1610s. Related: Sickened; sickening. The earlier verb was simply sick (Old English seocan) "to be ill, fall ill."
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lovesick (adj.)
also love-sick, "languishing with amorous desire," 1520s, from love (n.) + sick (adj.). Related: Lovesickness.
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heartsick (adj.)
also heart-sick, "despondent," late 14c., from heart (n.) + sick (adj.). Old English heortseoc meant "ill from heart disease."
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sorrow (n.)

Old English sorg "grief, regret, trouble, care, pain, anxiety," from Proto-Germanic *sorg- (source also of Old Saxon sorga, Old Norse sorg, Middle Dutch sorghe, Dutch zorg, Old High German soraga, German sorge, Gothic saurga), perhaps from PIE *swergh- "to worry, be sick" (source also of Sanskrit surksati "cares for," Lithuanian sergu, sirgti "to be sick," Old Church Slavonic sraga "sickness," Old Irish serg "sickness"). Not connected etymologically with sore (adj.) or sorry.

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seasick (adj.)

also sea-sick, "affected with nausea from the motion of a vessel," 1560s, from sea + sick (n.). Related: Seasickness. Middle English se-sik meant "weary of travelling on the sea" (mid-15c.).

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sic (v.)
"to set upon, attack;" see sick (v.).
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malinger (v.)

"to pretend illness to escape duty," 1820, from French malingrer "to suffer," a slang word that probably also at one time meant "pretend to be ill," from malingre "ailing, sickly" (13c.), which is of uncertain origin, possibly a blend of mingre "sickly, miserable" and malade "ill." Mingre is itself a blend of maigre "meager" (see meager) + haingre "sick, haggard," which is possibly from Germanic (compare Middle High German hager "thin").

The sense evolution in French would be through the notion of beggars who feigned to be sick or exhibited sham sores to excite compassion. Malingerer is attested from 1761, in a translation of de Saxe; malingering as a verbal noun is attested from 1778. Related: Malingered.

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ailing (adj.)
"sick, ill, suffering," 1590s, present-participle adjective from ail (v.).
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caregiver (n.)
also care-giver, "one who looks after the physical needs at home of the sick, aged, disabled, etc.," by 1974, from care (n.) + giver. It has, in many senses, the same meaning as caretaker, which ought to be its antonym.
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