Etymology
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fielding (n.)

"play in the field," 1823 in cricket (by 1867 in baseball), verbal noun from field (v.).

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southpaw (n.)
"lefthander," 1885, originally baseball slang, of pitchers, often said to have been coined by Finley Peter Dunne ("Mr. Dooley"), Chicago sports journalist and humorist, in the days when, it is said, baseball diamonds regularly were laid out with home plate to the west. But south paw "a person's left hand" is attested from 1848 in the slang of pugilism.
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phenom (n.)

shortened form of phenomenon, U.S. baseball slang, attested by 1890.

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shortstop (n.)

also short-stop, 1837 in cricket ("player stationed behind the wicket-keeper at about 45 degrees to the wicket"); 1857 in baseball ("player stationed between second and third base"); from short (adj.) + stop (n.). In cricket there is a longstop, but in baseball there is none.

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baseman (n.)
in baseball, player whose defensive position is at one of the three bases, by 1857, from base (n.) + man (n.).
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portsider (n.)

"left-handed person," 1913, American English baseball slang, from port (n.4) in the nautical sense + side (n.).

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assist (n.)
1570s, "an act of assistance," from assist (v.). In the sporting sense attested 1877 in baseball, 1925 in ice hockey.
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slugger (n.)
1877, originally in baseball, agent noun from slug (v.). Meaning "one who hits with the fists" is from 1883.
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pop-up (n.)
from 1906 as a type of baseball hit; from pop (v.) + up (adv.). As an adjective from 1934 (of a children's book, later toasters, etc.).
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at-bat (n.)
"baseball player's turn at the plate," 1912, originally a column heading in statistics tables, from the prepositional phrase.
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