Etymology
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allotrope (n.)

"a form in which an element having the property of allotropy may exist," 1847, a back-formation from allotropy "variation of physical properties without change of substance," from Greek allotropos "in another manner;" see allo- "different" + -trope "way, manner." Diamond is an allotrope of carbon. Related: Allotropic.

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baguette (n.)

1731, a type of architectural ornament, from French baguette "a wand, rod, stick" (16c.), from Italian bacchetta, literally "a small rod," diminutive of bacchio "rod," from Latin baculum "a stick" (see bacillus). The meaning "a diamond cut long" is from 1926; that of "a long, thin loaf of French bread" is from 1958.

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RBI (n.)

also R.B.I., in baseball, 1947, short for run batted in.

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backstop (n.)

1819, "something at the back as a barrier;" see back (adj.) + stop (n.). In U.S. baseball, from 1889, "fence a short distance behind the catcher on a baseball team;" the figurative extension to the catcher himself is by 1890. The verb is attested from 1956 in the sense of "support." Related: Backstopped; backstopping.

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Darjeeling 

town in northeastern India, from Tibetan dojeling "diamond island," in reference to Vajrayana (literally "vehicle of the diamond") Buddhism. The "island" being the high ground of the place's site. As a type of tea, by 1862.

The first trial of the tea plant at Darjeeling was made in 1841, with a few seeds grown in Kumaon from China stock. It was quite successful as to its growth, and the quality was approved of by the Assam tea planter who visited Darjeeling in 1846, and made the first tea here. The original plants are now to be seen. All are of gigantic size; one is a bush 50 feet in circumference and 20 feet high. [list of contributions from British India at the New Zealand Exhibition of 1865]
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bush league (adj.)

"mean, petty, unprofessional," 1906, from baseball slang for the small-town baseball clubs below the minor league where talent was developed (by 1903), from bush (n.) in the adjectival slang sense of "rural, provincial," which originally was simple description, not a value judgment.

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twi-night (adj.)

1939, in reference to evening double-header baseball games, from twilight + night.

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catcher (n.)

"one who catches," in any sense, mid-14c., agent noun from catch (v.). Baseball sense is from 1867.

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Argyle (n.)

"diamond-shaped pattern of two or more colors in fabric," said to be so called from similarity to tartans worn by Campbell clan of Argyll, Scotland. The place name is literally "land of the Gaels," with first element from Old Irish airer "country." Argyle socks is from 1935.

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phenom (n.)

shortened form of phenomenon, U.S. baseball slang, attested by 1890.

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