Etymology
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phage (n.)
virus that destroys bacteria, 1917, an abbreviated form of bacteriophage.
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acidophilus (adj.)
1920, used of milk fermented by acidophilic bacteria, from acidophil (1900), indicating "easily stained by acid dyes," a hybrid word, from Latin acidus "acidic, sour, tart" (see acid (adj.)) + Greek philos "loving" (see -phile); the bacteria so called because they stain easily with an acid dye.
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streptococcus (n.)
bacteria genus, 1877, Modern Latin, coined by Viennese surgeon Albert Theodor Billroth (1829-1894) from strepto- "twisted" + Modern Latin coccus "spherical bacterium," from Greek kokkos "berry" (see cocco-). So called because the bacteria usually form chains.
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biodegradable (adj.)
also bio-degradable, "susceptible to decomposition by living organisms" (especially bacteria), 1962, from bio- + degrade + -able.
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toxin (n.)
"organic poison," especially one produced by bacteria in an animal body, 1886, from toxic + -in (2).
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prokaryotic (adj.)

"having no nuclear membrane in its cell" (as bacteria and blue-green algae), 1957, from prokaryote + -ic. Related: Prokaryon.

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cocci (n.)

spherical-shaped bacteria, plural of Latin coccus (attested from 1883 as a bacterium name), from Greek kokkos "berry" (see cocco-).

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saprophyte (n.)

"bacteria or fungus that grows on decaying organic matter," 1867, from French, from Greek sapros "putrid, rotten" (see sapro-) + phyton "plant" (see -phyte). Related: Saprophytism.

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lysis (n.)
"dissolution of cells, bacteria, etc.," 1902, from -lysis or from Latin lysis, from Greek lysis "a loosening," from lyein "to unfasten, loose, loosen, untie" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"). Earlier in the sense "gradual recession of a disease" (1834).
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E. coli (n.)

bacteria inhabiting the gut of man and animals, by 1921, short for Escherichia coli (1911), named for German physician Theodor Escherich (1857-1911) with Latin genitive of colon "colon" (see colon (n.2)).

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