Etymology
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back-formation (n.)

also back formation, "word formed from an existing word, often by removal of a suffix or supposed suffix," by 1887, from back (adv.) + formation.

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back-slang (n.)
"words pronounced or written backwards or nearly so," 1860, from back (adj. or adv.) + slang (n.).
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pull-back (n.)

also pullback, 1660s, "act or action of pulling back," from the verbal phrase; see pull (v.) + back (adv.). From 1951 in the military sense of "orderly withdrawal of troops."

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canvas-back (n.)
also canvasback, 1785 as a type of North American duck, so called for the color of the back. Earlier as an adjective for a type of garment made of expensive stuff in front and cheap canvas in the back (c. 1600); from canvas (n.) + back (n.).
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backstroke (n.)
also back-stroke, 1670s, "counter-punch;" see back (adv.) + stroke (n.). From 1876 as a swimming stroke, from back (n.).
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back-to-nature (adj.)
1915, from the adverbial phrase.
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backer (n.)
"supporter, one who aids and abets," 1580s, agent noun from back (v.).
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backscratcher (n.)
also back-scratcher, 1834; see back (n.) + scratch (v.).
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backstreet (n.)
mid-15c., from back (adj.), here perhaps with a sense "inferior, mean, obscure" + street.
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backslash (n.)
punctuation symbol introduced for computer purposes, by 1977, from back (adj.) + slash (n.).
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