Etymology
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fat-back (n.)
also fatback, cut of pork, 1903, from fat + back (n.). So called because taken from the back of the animal.
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back up (v.)
1767, "stand behind and support," from back (v.) + up (adv.). Meaning "move or force backward" is by 1834. Of water prevented from flowing, by 1837.
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ladder-back (adj.)
1898 as a type of chair, from ladder (n.) + back (n.).
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back-formation (n.)

also back formation, "word formed from an existing word, often by removal of a suffix or supposed suffix," by 1887, from back (adv.) + formation.

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back-slang (n.)
"words pronounced or written backwards or nearly so," 1860, from back (adj. or adv.) + slang (n.).
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back down (v.)
in figurative sense of "withdraw a charge," 1859, American English, from notion of descending a ladder, etc. (the literal sense by 1849); from back (v.) + down (adv.).
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pull-back (n.)

also pullback, 1660s, "act or action of pulling back," from the verbal phrase; see pull (v.) + back (adv.). From 1951 in the military sense of "orderly withdrawal of troops."

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canvas-back (n.)
also canvasback, 1785 as a type of North American duck, so called for the color of the back. Earlier as an adjective for a type of garment made of expensive stuff in front and cheap canvas in the back (c. 1600); from canvas (n.) + back (n.).
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back seat (n.)

also back-seat, 1832, originally of coaches, from back (adj.) + seat (n.). Used figuratively for "less or least prominent position" by 1868. Back-seat driver attested by 1923.

You know him. The one who sits on the back seat and tells the driver what to do. He issues a lot of instructions, gives advice, offers no end of criticism and doesn't do a bit of work. ["The Back Seat Driver," Wisconsin Congregational Church Life, May 1923]
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backstroke (n.)
also back-stroke, 1670s, "counter-punch;" see back (adv.) + stroke (n.). From 1876 as a swimming stroke, from back (n.).
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