Etymology
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bed-sore (n.)

"gangrene caused by anemia due to continued pressure," 1833, from bed (n.) + sore (n.). A kind of ulcer liable to afflict persons long confined in bed and unable to change position.

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bed-swerver (n.)

"one false or unfaithful to a marriage bed," 1610s, from bed (n.) + agent noun from swerve (v.).

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seed-bed (n.)

"piece of ground prepared for receiving seed," 1650s, from seed (n.) + bed (n.) "garden plot." Figurative use is by 1826.

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nappy (n.)

British colloquial for "baby's diaper," 1927, from use of napkin in this sense. Related: Nappies.

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bedding (n.)

late Old English beddinge "materials of a bed, bed covering," from bed (n.). The meaning "bottom layer of anything" is from c. 1400.

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bedspread (n.)

also bed-spread, "uppermost quilt or covering of a bed, generally ornamental," 1830, American English, from bed (n.) + spread (n.).

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sickbed (n.)

also sick-bed, "bed upon which one lies ill," early 15c., from sick (adj.) + bed (n.).

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abed (adv.)

"in bed," c. 1200, contraction of Old English on bedde "in bed," from a- (1) + dative of bed (n.).

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childbed (n.)

also child-bed, c. 1200, "state of being in labor," from child + bed (n.). In reference to a bed (real or metaphorical) on which someone or something is born, from 1590s.

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