Etymology
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Luger (n.)
type of German automatic pistol, 1904, from the surname of Georg Luger (1849-1923), Austrian-born firearms expert.
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thermograph (n.)
"automatic self-registering thermometer," 1881, from thermo- + -graph "instrument for recording; something written." Related: Thermographic.
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pom-pom (n.)
"Maxim automatic gun," 1899, of imitative origin, soldiers' slang from the Boer War. For the ornamental tuft, see pompom.
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thermostat (n.)
automatic instrument for regulating temperature, 1831, from thermo- + -stat.
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automatism (n.)

1803, "the doctrine that animals below man are devoid of consciousness;" see automaton + -ism. By 1856 as "automatic or involuntary action."

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automate (v.)
"to convert to automatic operation," 1954, back-formation from automated (q.v.). Ancient Greek verb automatizein meant "to act of oneself, to act unadvisedly." Related: Automating.
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laundromat (n.)
"automatic coin-operated public laundry," 1946, originally (1942) a proprietary name by Westinghouse for a type of automatic washing machine; from laundry + ending probably suggested by automat. Earlier words for public clothes-washing places in U.S. were washateria (1935), laundrette (1945). Launderette is from 1947. The Westinghouse machine was popular after World War II and was available with coin chutes and timers.
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automatization (n.)

in reference to the actions or reactions of higher animals, "a rendering automatic," by 1869, noun of action from automatize. Generally, automatization is used of animals, automation of machinery.

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Toyota 
Japanese automaker, begun 1930s as a division of Toyoda Automatic Loom Works, named for the family name of the founder. There seems to be no one accepted explanation for the change from -d- to -t-.
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motility (n.)

"capacity of automatic or spontaneous movement," 1827, from French motilité (1827), from Latin mot-, stem of movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

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