Etymology
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thermograph (n.)

"automatic self-registering thermometer," 1881, from thermo- + -graph "instrument for recording; something written." Related: Thermographic.

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zip (n.1)

"sound of something moving rapidly," 1875, imitative. Zip gun "homemade pistol" is attested by 1950.

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handgun (n.)

mid-14c., of unmounted firearms, from hand (n.) + gun (n.). In modern use, "a pistol," from 1930s, American English.

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pistle (n.)

"a letter, a communication," Old English pistol, a shortening of epistol, from Latin epistola (see epistle). Compare postle from apostle.

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thermostat (n.)

automatic instrument for regulating temperature, 1831, from thermo- + -stat.

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automat (n.)

"automated cafeteria," 1903, probably from automatic (adj.), though the system itself is said to have originated in Germany, and the word may be from German. Earlier it meant "an automaton" (1670s).

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pom-pom (n.)

"Maxim automatic gun," 1899, of imitative origin, soldiers' slang from the Boer War. For the ornamental tuft, see pompom.

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automatically (adv.)

1834, "involuntarily, unconsciously," from automatical (see automatic (adj.)) + -ly (2).

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automated (adj.)

"done by automatic equipment," 1952, American English, adjective based on automation.

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firearm (n.)

also fire-arm, 1640s, from fire (n.) + arm (n.2). Anything which expels a missile by combustion of gunpowder (or a similar substance), from a pistol to a cannon. Related: Firearms.

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