Etymology
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grant (v.)
in early use also graunt, early 13c., "to allow, permit (something); consent to (a prayer, request, etc.)," from Old French graanter, variant of creanter "assure, promise, guarantee, swear; confirm, authorize, approve (of)," from Latin credentem (nominative credens), present participle of credere "to believe, to trust" (see credo). From c. 1300 as "transfer possession of in any formal way." Meaning "admit to be true, acknowledge" in English is from c. 1300; hence to take (something) for granted "regard as not requiring proof" (1610s). The irregular change of -c- to -g- in Old French is perhaps from influence of garantir. Related: Granted; granting.
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rhinoceros (n.)

"ungainly quadruped having tough, thick skin and usually one or two horns on the snout," once widespread but now limited to Africa and South Asia, c. 1300, rinoceros, "a rhinoceros," also "a horned beast, sometimes regarded as a species of unicorn" [Middle English Compendium], from Latin rhinoceros, from Greek rhinokerōs, literally "nose-horned," from rhinos "nose" (a word of unknown origin) + keras (genitive keratos, kerōs) "horn of an animal" (from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head").

What is the plural of rhinoceros? ... Well, Liddell and Scott seem to authorize 'rhinocerotes,' which is pedantic, but 'rhinoceroses' is not euphonious. [Sir Charles Eliot, "The East Africa Protectorate," 1905]

Medieval Latin used rhinocerota. The adjective also is unsettled: Candidates include rhinocerotic, rhinocerical, rhinocerontine, rhinocerine. The rhinoceros beetle (by 1680s) is so called for the large, upcurved horn on the head of males.

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