Etymology
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Kiplingesque (adj.)
1894, from English author Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) + -esque.
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dramatist (n.)

"an author of plays, a playwright," 1670s, see drama (Greek stem dramat-) + -ist.

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scribbler (n.)

"petty author; one who writes carelessly or badly," 1550s, agent noun from scribble (v.).

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unpublished (adj.)
c. 1600, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of publish. In reference to an author, attested from 1934.
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Erewhon (n.)

"utopia," from title of a book published 1872 by British author Samuel Butler, a partial reversal of nowhere.

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anthologize (v.)

"include (a work or author) in an anthology," 1889; see anthology + -ize. Related: Anthologized; anthologizing.

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Ovid 

Roman poet (43 B.C.E.-17 C.E.), author of the "Metamorphoses," in full Publius Ovidius Nasso. Related: Ovidian.

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golliwog (n.)

type of grotesque blackface doll, 1895, coined by English children's book author and illustrator Florence K. Upton, perhaps from golly + polliwog.

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Rabelaisian (adj.)

1775, "of or pertaining to the writings or style of 16c. French author François Rabelais," whose writings "are distinguished by exuberance of imagination and language combined with extravagance and coarseness of humor and satire." [OED]

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SMERSH (n.)
Soviet Army counter-espionage organization begun during World War II, 1953, from Russian abbreviation of smert' shpionam "death to spies." Introduced in English by "James Bond" author Ian Fleming.
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