Etymology
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non-attendance (n.)

also nonattendance, "failure to attend, omission of attendance," 1680s, from non- + attendance.

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squire (v.)
"to attend (a lady) as a gallant," late 14c., from squire (n.). Related: Squired; squiring.
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tender (n.1)
"person who tends another," late 15c., probably an agent noun formed from Middle English tenden "attend to" (see tend (v.2)); later extended to locomotive engineers (1825) and barmen (1883). The meaning "small boat used to attend larger ones" first recorded 1670s.
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sit-in 
1936, in reference to session musicians; 1937, in reference to union action; 1941, in reference to student protests. From the verbal phrase; see sit (v.) + in (adv.). To sit in is attested from 1868 in the sense "attend, be present;" from 1919 specifically as "attend as an observer."
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spectate (v.)
"to attend (a sporting event, etc.) to watch, not participate," 1929, back-formation from spectator. Related: Spectated; spectating. Related: Spectation.
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observative (adj.)

"of or pertaining to observation," 1610s, from Latin observat-, past-participle stem of observare "watch over, note, heed, look to, attend to, guard, regard, comply with" (see observe) + -ive.

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audit (v.)
mid-15c., "examine and verify (accounts)," from audit (n.). Meaning "attend (a course, etc.) without intending to earn credit by doing course-work" is from 1933. Related: Audited; auditing.
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minister (v.)
Origin and meaning of minister

early 14c., ministren, "to perform religious rites, provide religious services;" mid-14c., "to serve (food or drink);" late 14c. "render service, aid, or medicine; furnish means of relief or remedy" from Old French menistrer "to serve, be of service, administer, attend, wait on," and directly from Latin ministrare "to serve, attend, wait upon," from minister "inferior, servant, priest's assistant" (see minister (n.)). Related: Ministered; ministering.

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chaperon (v.)

"act as a chaperon, attend (an unmarried girl or woman) in public," 1792, also chaperone, from chaperon (n.), or from French chaperonner, from the noun in French. Related: Chaperoned; chaperoning.

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assistant (adj.)
mid-15c., "helpful, of assistance," from Latin assistentem (nominative assistens), present participle of assistere "stand by, attend" (see assist (v.)). The spelling changed in French then (16c.) in English.
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