Etymology
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comradery (n.)

"state or feeling of a comrade," 1862, an attempt to nativize camaraderie. Comradeship is attested from 1815.

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try (n.)
late 15c., "screen for sifting," from try (v.). From 1832 as "an effort, an attempt."
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aggressor (n.)
1670s, "person who first attacks," from Latin aggressor, agent noun from past participle stem of aggredi "to approach; to attempt; to attack" (see aggression).
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cuz 
17c. as an abbreviation of cousin; 1889 as an attempt to represent the lazy pronunciation of because.
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one-shot (adj.)
1907, "achieved in a single attempt" (original reference is to golf), from one + shot (n.). Meaning "happening or of use only once" is from 1937.
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helluva (adj.)
"very bad, infernal; tremendous," 1910, attempt to represent the casual pronunciation of expression hell of a _____, which is attested from 1776 (see hell).
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brainwashing (n.)
"attempt to alter or control the thoughts and beliefs of another person against his will by psychological techniques," 1950, a literal translation of Chinese xi nao. A term from the Korean War.
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threaten (v.)
late 13c., "attempt to influence by menacing," from Old English þreatnian "to threaten" (see threat). Related: Threatened. Threatening in the sense of "portending no good" is recorded from 1520s.
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chirurgeon (n.)

1530s, a failed attempt to restore Greek spelling to the word that had got into English as surgeon. Related: Chirurgery. Compare French chirurgien, the modern spelling, which has been conformed to Latin.

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essay (n.)

1590s, "trial, attempt, endeavor," also "short, discursive literary composition" (first attested in writings of Francis Bacon, probably in imitation of Montaigne), from French essai "trial, attempt, essay" (in Old French from 12c.), from Late Latin exagium "a weighing, a weight," from Latin exigere "drive out; require, exact; examine, try, test," from ex "out" (see ex-) + agere "to set in motion, drive" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move") apparently meaning here "to weigh." The suggestion is of unpolished writing. Compare assay, also examine.

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