Etymology
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Lisbon 
capital of Portugal, Portuguese Lisboa, perhaps from a Phoenician word; the derivation from Ulysses probably is folk-etymology.
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diddums 

nonsense word used as an expression to a baby, attested by 1888; of no etymology.

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biomorphic (adj.)

1880, in biology, from bio- "life" + -morphic, from Greek morphē "form, shape," a word of uncertain etymology.

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phimosis (n.)

"contraction of the preputial orifice," 1670s, from Greek phimosis, literally "muzzling," from phimos "a muzzle, a gag," a word of unexplained etymology.

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Kiev 
Ukrainian Kyyiv, of unknown origin; explanation from the name of a founding prince named Kiy probably is folk etymology. Related: Kievan.
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morphic (adj.)

in biology, "of or pertaining to form," 1826, from Greek morphē "form, shape," a word of uncertain etymology, + -ic.

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scut (n.2)

term of contempt for a person, 1873, of unknown etymology. OED suggests it is a variant of scout (v.2).

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dalek (n.)

robot in the "Dr. Who" television program on BBC, 1963, an invented word of no etymology.

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Shasta 
mountain in California, named for local native tribe, for whose name Bright offers no etymology.
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bronchia (n.)
"bronchial tubes," 1670s, from Latinized form of Greek bronkhia, plural of bronkhos "windpipe, throat," which is of unknown etymology.
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