Etymology
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accomplice (n.)
"associate in crime," 1580s, an unetymological extension of earlier complice "an associate or confederate" (early 15c.), from Old French complice "a confederate, partner" (not in a criminal sense), from Late Latin complicem (nominative complex) "partner, confederate," from Latin complicare "to involve," literally "fold together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + plicare "to fold, weave" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Altered perhaps on model of accomplish, etc., or by assimilation of the indefinite article in a complice.
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comitatus (n.)

1875, "body of companions or attendants," Latin collective of comes, comitem "a companion, an associate" (see count (n.1)). In posse comitatus it means "of a county."

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sidekick (n.)
also side-kick, "companion or close associate," 1901, also side-kicker (1903), American English, of unknown origin. Earlier terms were side-pal (1886), side-partner (1886).
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sociology (n.)
the science of social phenomena, 1842, from French sociologie, a hybrid coined 1830 by French philosopher Isidore Auguste Comte (1798-1857), from Latin socius "associate" (see social (adj.)) + Greek-derived suffix -logie (see -logy).
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messmate (n.)

"an associate in a mess," especially a ship's mess; "one who eats ordinarily at the same table with another," 1746, from mess (n.) "communal eating place" + mate (n.), the etymological sense of which is "one eating at the same table, messmate."

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frequent (v.)
late 15c., "visit or associate with," from Old French frequenter "attend frequently; assemble, gather together," from Latin frequentare "visit regularly; do frequently, repeat; assemble in throngs," from frequentem (see frequent (adj.)). Meaning "visit often" is from 1550s. Related: Frequented; frequenter; frequenting.
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Burne-Jones 
English artist and designer Edward C. Burne-Jones (1833-1898), an associate of William Morris and the Pre-Raphaelites, whose work, popular late 19c., featured women who were pale, thin, and hollow-cheeked, with large, haunted eyes.
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runaround (n.)

also run-around, "deceptive, evasive treatment," 1915, from the verbal phrase; see run (v.) + around (adv.). To run around with "associate with, consort with," especially of the opposite sex, is by 1887. To run around "go about hurriedly with no fixed goal" is by 1920.

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commoner (n.)

late 14c. (mid-14c. in Anglo-French), "one of the common people, a member of the third estate," agent noun from common (v.) "participate in common, associate or have dealings with" (mid-14c.), from common (adj.). From mid-15c. as "member of the House of Commons."

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socio- 
word-forming element meaning "social, of society; social and," also "having to do with sociology," from combining form of Latin socius "companion, ally, associate, fellow, sharer," from PIE *sokw-yo-, suffixed form of root *sekw- (1) "to follow." Common in compounds since c. 1880.
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