Etymology
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disagree (v.)

late 15c., "refuse assent to," from Old French desagreer (12c.), from des- "not, opposite of" (see dis-) + agreer "to please, satisfy; to receive with favor, take pleasure in" (see agree). Sense of "differ in opinion, express contrary views" is from 1550s. Related: Disagreed; disagreeing.

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accession (n.)
Origin and meaning of accession

1580s, "that which is added," also "act of acceding" (by assent, to an agreement, etc.), from Latin accessionem (nominative accessio) "a going to, approach; a joining; increase, enlargement," noun of action from past-participle stem of accedere "approach, enter upon" (see accede). From 1640s as "act of coming to a position or into possession," especially in reference to a throne. Related: Accessional.

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subscribe (v.)

early 15c., "to sign at the bottom of a document," from Latin subscribere "write, write underneath, sign one's name; register," also figuratively "assent, agree to, approve," from sub "underneath" (see sub-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). The meaning "give one's consent" (by subscribing one's name) first recorded mid-15c.; that of "contribute money to" 1630s; and that of "become a regular buyer of a publication" 1711, all originally literal. Related: Subscribed; subscribing.

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cogent (adj.)

"compelling assent or conviction," 1650s, from French cogent "necessary, urgent" (14c.), from Latin cogentem (nominative cogens), present participle of cogere "to curdle; to compel; to collect," literally "to drive together," from assimilated form of com "together" (see co-) + agere "to set in motion, drive, drive forward; to do, perform" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move"). Related: Cogently.

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congressional (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a congress," 1690s, from Latin congressionem (from congressus, see congress) + -al (1); specifically "of or pertaining to the Congress of the American states" from 1776. As such the word was at first reviled as barbarous, but Pickering (1816) quotes an unnamed English correspondent: "The term Congress belonging to America, the Americans may employ its derivatives, without waiting for the assent of the English."

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praise (n.)

"expression of approbation or esteem because of some virtue, performance, or quality," early 14c., from praise (v.). Not common until 16c.; the earlier noun, and the common one through most of the Middle English period, was praising (c. 1200).

Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer,
And without sneering, teach the rest to sneer;
[Pope, "Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot"]
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approbation (n.)

"approval, endorsement," early 15c., approbacioun, from Old French aprobacion "approval" (Modern French approbation) and directly from Latin approbationem (nominative approbatio) "an approval," noun of action from past-participle stem of approbare "to assent to" as good, from ad "to" (see ad-) + probare "to try, test something (to find if it is good)," from probus "honest, genuine" (see prove). Also in Middle English in a now-obsolete sense of "proven effectiveness, excellence" (late 14c.).

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consent (v.)
Origin and meaning of consent

c. 1300, "agree, give assent; yield when one has the right, power, or will to oppose," from Old French consentir "agree; comply" (12c.) and directly from Latin consentire "agree, accord," literally "feel together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sentire "to feel" (see sense (n.)).

"Feeling together," hence, "agreeing, giving permission," a sense evolution that apparently took place in French before the word reached English. Related: Consented; consenting.

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confirmation (n.)

c. 1300, confyrmacyoun, the rite whereby baptized persons are admitted to full communion with the Church, from Old French confirmacion (13c.) "strengthening, confirmation; proof; ratification," and directly from Latin confirmationem (nominative confirmatio) "a securing, establishing; an assurance, encouragement," noun of action from past-participle stem of confirmare (see confirm).

Meaning "verification, proof, supporting evidence" is from late 14c. Meaning "act of rendering valid by formal assent of authority" is from c. 1400; sense of "action of making sure, a rendering certain or proving to be true" from early 15c.

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prorogue (v.)

early 15c., prorogen, "to prolong, extend" (a truce, agreement, etc.), a sense now obsolete, from Old French proroger, proroguer (14c.) and directly from Latin prorogare, literally "to ask publicly," from pro "before" (see pro-) + rogare "to ask, inquire, question; ask a favor," also "to propose (a law, a candidate);" see rogation. Perhaps the original sense in Latin was "to ask for public assent to extending someone's term in office."

The parliamentary meaning "discontinue temporarily, adjourn until a later time without dissolution" is attested from mid-15c. Related: Prorogued; prorogation.

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