Etymology
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undress (v.)
1590s, "to shed one's clothing," from un- (2) "opposite of" + dress (v.). Transitive sense of "to strip off (someone's) clothing" is recorded from 1610s. Related: Undressed; undressing.
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accoutrement (n.)

usually plural, accoutrements, "personal clothing and equipment," 1540s, from French accoustrement (Modern French accoutrement), from accoustrer, from Old French acostrer "arrange, dispose, put on (clothing)," probably originally "sew up" (see accouter).

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el 
Spanish article, from Latin ille "that" (see le).
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liveried (adj.)
1630s, from livery (n.) in the sense "distinctive clothing given to servants."
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understated (adj.)
1939, of clothing, fashions, writing, etc., figurative use of the past participle of understate (v.).
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immunize (v.)
1889, in a translation of a German article, from immune + -ize. Related: Immunized; immunizing.
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vesture (n.)
late 14c., "garments, clothes worn by a person at one time," from Anglo-French and Old French vesture, vesteure "dress, clothes, clothing," from Vulgar Latin *vestitura "vestments, clothing," from Latin vestivus, past participle of vestire "to clothe," from PIE *wes- (4) "to clothe" (see wear (v.)).
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skin-tight (adj.)
"fitting like skin," 1885, originally of men's clothing, from skin (n.) + tight (adj.).
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fatigues (n.)
1776, "extra duties of a soldier," from fatigue (n.). As a military clothing outfit, from 1836, short for fatigue dress (1833); fatigue cap is from 1824.
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pleather (n.)

"artificial or synthetic leather as a material in clothing, upholstery, etc.," by 1991, from plastic + leather.

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