Etymology
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pronounce (v.)

mid-14c., pronouncen, "to declare officially, proclaim, announce;" late 14c., "to speak, utter" (words, a language, etc.), "form or articulate with the organs of speech," from Old French prononcier "declare, speak out, pronounce" (late 13c., Modern French prononcer) and directly from Late Latin pronunciare, from Latin pronuntiare "to proclaim, announce; pronounce, utter," from pro "forth, out, in public" (see pro-) + nuntiare "announce," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout").

With reference to the mode of sounding words or languages, it is attested by 1610s (pronunciation in the related sense is attested from early 15c.). Meaning "make a statement," especially authoritative one (as in pronounce judgment) is from early 15c. Related: Pronounced; pronouncing.

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denunciation (n.)

early 15c., denunciacioun, "act of declaring or stating something" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin denunciacionem / denuntiationem (nominative denuntiatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of denuntiare "to announce, proclaim; denounce, menace; command, order," from de "down" (see de-) + nuntiare "proclaim, announce," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout"). Meaning "a charge, a solemn or formal declaration accompanied by a menace" is mid-15c.

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descry (v.2)

mid-14c., "to proclaim, announce, make known," a word now obsolete, from Old French descrier, from des- (see dis-) + crier, from Latin quiritare "to wail, shriek" (see cry (v.)).

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bode (v.)

Old English bodian "proclaim, announce; announce beforehand, foretell," from boda "messenger," probably from Proto-Germanic *budon- (source also of Old Saxon gibod, German gebot, Old Norse boð), from PIE root *bheudh- "be aware, make aware."

With good or ill, "give a (good or bad) portent or promise," late 14c. As a shortened form of forebode "presage" (usually something evil), it dates from 1740. Related: Boded; boding.

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denounce (v.)

early 14c., "announce, make known in a formal manner" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French denoncier (12c., Modern French dénoncer) and directly from Latin denuntiare "to announce, proclaim; denounce, menace; command, order," from de- "down" + nuntiare "proclaim, announce," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout").

The negative sense in English developed (probably encouraged by other words in de-) via the meanings "proclaim as cursed, excommunicated, removed from office" (early 14c.); "formally or publicly threaten to do" (1630s); "declare or proclaim to be cursed, wicked, or evil" (1660s). The meaning "make formal or public accusation against, inform against, accuse" (especially in turning on one's co-conspirators) is from late 15c. Related: Denounced; denouncing.

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declare (v.)

mid-14c., declaren, "explain, interpret, make clear;" late 14c., "make known by words, state explicitly, proclaim, announce," from Old French declarer "explain, elucidate," or directly from Latin declarare "make clear, reveal, disclose, announce," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clarare "to clarify," from clarus "clear" (see clear (adj.)).

From mid-15c. as "assert, affirm." Intransitive sense "make known one's thoughts or intentions" is by 1840. Related: Declared; declaring.

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indictive (adj.)
"proclaimed," 1650s, from Late Latin indictivus "proclaimed," from Latin indicere "to declare publicly, proclaim, announce," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + dicere "to speak, say, tell" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly").
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gazette (v.)
"to announce in the Gazette," 1670s; see gazette (n.). The three official journals were published in Britain from c. 1665, twice weekly, and contained lists of appointments, promotions, public notices, etc. Hence, to be gazetted was "to be named to a command, etc."
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declaratory (adj.)

mid-15c., "clarifying, explanatory," from Medieval Latin declaratorius, from Latin declarator, from declarare "make clear, reveal, disclose, announce," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clarare "to clarify," from clarus "clear" (see clear (adj.)). From 1580s as "making declaration or exhibition, affirmative." Related: Declaratorily.

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intimation (n.)

mid-15c., "action of making known," from Old French intimation (14c.), from Late Latin intimationem (nominative intimatio) "an announcement," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin intimare "make known, announce, impress" (see intimate (adj.)). Meaning "action of expressing by suggestion or hint, indirect imparting of information" is from 1530s.

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