Etymology
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seeding (n.)

c. 1300, sēdinge, "the production of seed;" 1540s, "the sowing of or with seed," verbal noun from seed (v.).

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flaxseed (n.)

also flax-seed, 1560s, from flax + seed (n.).

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seminal (adj.)

late 14c., "of or pertaining to seed or semen, of the elements of reproduction," from Old French seminal (14c.) and directly from Latin seminalis "of or belonging to seed; good for seed," from semen (genitive seminis) "seed" (from PIE root *sē- "to sow"). Figurative sense ("having the properties of a seed") is attested by 1630s, "rudimentary, primary; full of possibilities." Related: Seminally; seminality.

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pip (n.1)

1797, "seed of an apple (or orange)," a shortened form of pipin "seed of a fleshy fruit" (early 14c.), from Old French pepin (13c.), probably from a root *pipp-, expressing smallness (compare Italian pippolo, Spanish pepita "seed, kernel").

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seeded (adj.)

1590s, "sown with seed," past-participle adjective from seed (v.). Also "bearing seed," hence "matured, fully grown" c. 1600. Of fruits, "having the seeds removed," by 1921. By 1922 in the sports sense (originally tennis). 

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seedling (n.)

"young plant reared from seed" (as opposed to a grafted shoot, etc.), 1650s, from seed (n.) + diminutive suffix -ling.

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pit (n.2)

"hard seed," 1841, from Dutch pit "kernel, seed, marrow," from Middle Dutch pitte, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *pithan-, source of pith (q.v.).

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linseed (n.)

Old English linsæd "seed of flax," from līn "flax" (see linen) + sæd "seed" (see seed (n.)). Used in ancient times as a source of medical treatments, in later use to produce linseed oil, used in paint, ink, varnishes, etc.

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sinsemilla (n.)

potent strain of marijuana, 1975, from Mexican Spanish, literally "without seed," ultimately from Latin sine "without" (see sans) + semen "seed" (from PIE root *sē- "to sow").

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spermato- 

before vowels spermat-, word-forming element meaning "seed, sperm," used from 1880s in scientific compounds, from Greek sperma (genitive spermatos "seed" of an animal or plant; see sperm).

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