Etymology
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zoomorphic (adj.)

"representative of animals," especially representative of a god in the form of an animal, 1872, from zoo- "animal" + morphē "shape," a word of uncertain etymology, + -ic. Related: Zoomorphism.

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deer (n.)

Old English deor "wild animal, beast, any wild quadruped," in early Middle English also used of ants and fish, from Proto-Germanic *deuzam, the general Germanic word for "animal" (as opposed to man), but often restricted to "wild animal" (source also of Old Frisian diar, Dutch dier, Old Norse dyr, Old High German tior, German Tier "animal," Gothic dius "wild animal," also see reindeer).

This is perhaps from PIE *dheusom "creature that breathes," from root *dheu- (1) "cloud, breath" (source also of Lithuanian dusti "gasp," dvėsti "gasp, perish;" Old Church Slavonic dychati "breathe"). For possible prehistoric sense development, compare Latin animal from anima "breath").

The sense specialization to a specific animal began in Old English (the usual Old English word for what we now call a deer was heorot; see hart), was common by 15c., and is now complete. It happened probably via hunting, deer being the favorite animal of the chase (compare Sanskrit mrga- "wild animal," used especially for "deer"). 

Deer-lick "salty spot where deer come to lick," is attested by 1778, in an American context. The deer-mouse (1840) is so called for its agility.

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epizootic (n.)

animal equivalent of epidemic, 1748, from French épizootique, from épizootie, irregularly formed from Greek epi "on, upon" (see epi-) + zōon "animal" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). As an adjective from 1790.

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zoophobia (n.)

1901, from zoo- "animal" + -phobia. Related: Zoophobic; zoophobe.

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Bryozoa (n.)

lowest class of mollusks, 1837, from bryo- "moss" + -zoa "animal," from Greek zoia, plural of zoion "animal" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). So called from the appearance of some species.

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cornichon (n.)

"small gherkin," 1825, from French cornichon, diminutive of corne "horn" (of an animal), from Latin cornu "horn of an animal," from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head." So called for their shape.

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crustacean (n.)

an animal of the class Crustacea, 1835; see Crustacea + -an. As an adjective, "of or pertaining to an animal of the class Crustacea," 1858 (an earlier adjective was crustaceous, "pertaining to crust, crust-like," 1640s).

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shellfish (n.)

also shell-fish, "animal that lives in the water and has a shell," Old English scylfiscas (plural); see shell (n.) + fish (n.) in the old general sense of "aquatic animal."

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vet (v.)

"to submit (an animal) to veterinary care," 1891, from veterinarian. The colloquial sense of "subject (something) to careful examination" (as of an animal by a veterinarian, especially of a horse before a race) is attested by 1901. Related: Vetted; vetting.

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