Etymology
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catholicity (n.)

1790, "Catholicism, faith or doctrines of the Catholic church," from Catholic + -ity. Meaning "quality of being inclusive or comprehensive" is by 1812.

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popish (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the Pope or the Roman Catholic Church," 1520s, a hostile coinage from Pope + -ish.

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Romish (adj.)

"Roman-Catholic," 1530s, "commonly used in a slightly invidious sense" [Century Dictionary], from Rome + -ish.

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nihil (n.)
Latin, literally "nothing" (see nil). Phrase nihil obstat "nothing stands in the way" printed on first pages of a Catholic work indicates its official approval.
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Romanize (v.)

c. 1600, "make Roman in character," from Roman + -ize. Intransitive sense of "follow Roman customs" is by 1620s; that of "become a Roman Catholic" is by 1630s. Related: Romanized; Romanizing; Romanization.

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zucchetto (n.)
small, round skull-cap worn by dignitaries in the Catholic Church, 1853, from Italian zucchetta "a cap," originally diminutive of zucca "gourd, head," perhaps from Late Latin cucutia, of unknown origin.
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biretta (n.)
square cap worn by Catholic clergy, 1590s, from Italian beretta, from Late Latin birrus, birrum "large cloak with hood;" which is perhaps of Gaulish origin, or from Greek pyrros "flame-colored, yellow."
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papist (n.)

1530s, "adherent of the pope, one who acknowledges the supreme authority of the Church of Rome," from French papiste, from papa "pope," from Church Latin papa (see pope). Historically usually a term of anti-Catholic opprobrium. Related: Papism.

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ex (n.)
1827, originally short for ex-Catholic; see ex-. Since 1929 as abbreviation for ex-wife, ex-husband, etc. Also used in some commercial compound words for "from, out of."
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probabilistic (adj.)

1855, in Catholic theology (see probabilism), from probabilist "one who holds the doctrine of probabilism" (1650s, from French probabiliste, 17c., from Latin probabilis, see probable) + -ic. Meaning "pertaining to probability, involving chance variations" is from 1951.

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