Etymology
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acatholic (adj.)
Origin and meaning of acatholic
"non-Catholic," 1809, from a- (3) + Catholic.
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Catholicism (n.)
"faith and practice of the Catholic church," 1610s, from Catholic + -ism.
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catholicity (n.)

1790, "Catholicism, faith or doctrines of the Catholic church," from Catholic + -ity. Meaning "quality of being inclusive or comprehensive" is by 1812.

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popish (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the Pope or the Roman Catholic Church," 1520s, a hostile coinage from Pope + -ish.

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Romish (adj.)

"Roman-Catholic," 1530s, "commonly used in a slightly invidious sense" [Century Dictionary], from Rome + -ish.

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Counter-reformation 

"the resurgence of the Catholic Church from mid-16c. to early 17c. in response to the Protestant Reformation," 1840, from counter- + Reformation.

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nihil (n.)
Latin, literally "nothing" (see nil). Phrase nihil obstat "nothing stands in the way" printed on first pages of a Catholic work indicates its official approval.
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Maronite 

sect of Syrian Christians, originally Monothelites, subsequently (1216) united with the Catholic Church; 1510s, from Late Latin Maronita, from Maron, name of the 4c. Syrian monk who was the founder.

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Romanize (v.)

c. 1600, "make Roman in character," from Roman + -ize. Intransitive sense of "follow Roman customs" is by 1620s; that of "become a Roman Catholic" is by 1630s. Related: Romanized; Romanizing; Romanization.

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Ursula 
fem. proper name, from Latin Ursula, diminutive of ursa "she-bear" (see ursine). The Ursuline order of Catholic women was founded as Brescia in 1537 and named for Saint Ursula.
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