Etymology
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angling (n.)

"art of fishing with a rod and line," late 15c., verbal noun from angle (v.1).

It is but a sory lyfe and an yuell to stand anglynge all day to catche a fewe fisshes. [John Palsgrave, 1530]
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septangle (n.)

"geometric figure having seven sides and seven angles," 1550s, from Late Latin septangulus, from Latin sept- "seven" (see septi-) + angulus "angle" (see angle (n.)). Related: Septangular.

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quinquangular (adj.)

"having five angles," 1650s, from Late Latin quinquangulus "five-cornered," from quinque "five" (from PIE root *penkwe- "five") + angulus "angle" (see angle (n.)). Quinquangle (n.) "pentagon" is attested from 1660s.

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triangle (n.)
late 14c., from Old French triangle (13c.), from Latin triangulum "triangle," noun use of neuter of adjective triangulus "three-cornered, having three angles," from tri- "three" (see tri-) + angulus "corner, angle" (see angle (n.)).
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Anglian (adj.)
"of the Angles; of East Anglia," 1726; see Angle. The Old English word was Englisc, but as this came to be used in reference to the whole Germanic people of Britain, a new word was wanted to describe this branch of them.
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anglicize (v.)

"make English, render conformable to English modes or usages," 1710, with -ize + Medieval Latin Anglicus "of the English," from Angli "the Angles" (see Angle). Related: Anglicized; anglicizing.

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pentangle (n.)

"five-pointed or five-angled figure, a pentagon or pentacle," late 14c., pent-angel, "a representation of a five-pointed star;" see penta- + angle (n.). In some early uses perhaps a corruption of pentacle. Related: Pentangular.

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Anglican (adj.)
1630s, "high-church, of the Church of England," from Medieval Latin Anglicanus, from Anglicus "of the English people, of England," from Angli "the Angles" (see Angle). The noun meaning "adherent of the Church of England" is first recorded 1797. Related: Anglicanism.
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angora (n.)
type of wool, 1810, from Angora, city in central Turkey (ancient Ancyra, modern Ankara), which gave its name to the goat (1745 in English), and to its silk-like wool, and to a cat whose fur resembles it (1771 in English). The city name is from the Greek word for "anchor, bend" (see angle (n.)).
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angular (adj.)
1590s, "having an angle or angles, pointy," from Latin angularis "having corners or angles," from angulus "angle, corner" (see angle (n.)). Earlier in an astrological sense, "occupying a cardinal point of the zodiac" (late 14c.). Angulous "having many corners" is from mid-15c. Angular as "measured by an angle" is from 1670s, hence angular motion "motion of a body which moves around a fixed point."
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