Etymology
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anoxic (adj.)
"characterized by or causing lack of oxygen in tissues," 1920, medical Latin, from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + first two letters of oxygen + -ic. Anoxia "oxygen deficiency" is attested from 1931.
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another (pron., adv.)
"not this, not the same; someone or something else," early 13c., merger of an + other. Old English used simply oþer. Originally "a second of two." Compound reciprocal pronoun one another is recorded from 1520s.
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anarch (n.)
1660s, "leader of leaderlessness," a deliciously paradoxical word used by Milton, Pope, Shelley, Byron; from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + arkhon "ruler" (see archon), and compare anarchy. Also "an anarchist" (1884).
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pyrotechnician (n.)

"manufacturer of fireworks, one skilled in pyrotechny," 1729, from pyrotechnic + -an.

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anaemia (n.)
"deficiency of blood in a living body," 1824, a medical term from French (1761), from Latinized form of Greek anaimia "lack of blood," from anaimos "bloodless," from an- "without" (see an- (1)) + haima "blood" (see -emia).
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Horatian (adj.)
1750, from Horatius (see Horace) + -an, or from Latin Horatianus.
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-ean 
variant of -an after names ending in -ea, -es, -eus.
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anorectic (adj.)
"characterized by want of appetite," 1832, medical Latin, from Greek anorektos "without appetite," from an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + orektos, verbal adjective of oregein "to long for, desire" (see anorexia). As a noun, attested from 1913.
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anhedonia (n.)

"inability to feel pleasure," 1897, from French anhédonie, coined 1896 by French psychologist Theodule Ribot as an opposite to analgesia, from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + hedone "pleasure" (see hedonist) + abstract noun ending -ia.

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Anopheles (n.)

genus of mosquitoes, Modern Latin, coined 1818 by German entomologist Johann Wilhelm Meigen from Greek anopheles "hurtful, harmful," literally "useless," from an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + ophelos "use, help, advantage," from PIE root *obhel- "to avail" (see Ophelia). So called because it conveys malaria.

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