Etymology
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amatory (adj.)

1590s, "pertaining to love, expressive of love" (especially sexual love), from Latin amatorius "loving, amorous," from amat-, past-participle stem of amare "to love" (see Amy). Related: Amatorial.

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lovesome (adj.)

Old English lufsum "worthy of love," from love (n.) + -some (1). Early 13c. as "lovely," 1720 as "amorous." An old word that yet might be useful in its original sense. Related: Lovesomely; lovesomeness.

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Delilah 

"temptress, treacherous lover," 1590s, from the name of the woman who seduced and betrayed Samson in Judges, from Hebrew Delilah, literally "delicate, languishing, amorous," from Semitic root d-l-l "to hang down, to languish."

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court (v.)
Origin and meaning of court

1570s, "endeavor to gain the favor of by amorous attention," also "solicit, seek to win or attract," from court (n.), based on the sorts of behavior associated with royal courts. Related: Courted; courting.

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love-making (n.)

"courtship," mid-15c.; see love (n.) + make (v.). Phrase make love is attested from 1570s in the sense "pay amorous attention to;" as a euphemism for "have sex," it is attested from c. 1950.

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amoretto (n.)

1590s, "a lover," from Italian, literally "little love," a diminutive of amore "love," from Latin amor "love, affection; one's beloved" (see Amy).

The English borrowed forms of this word more than once from the continental languages, perhaps perceiving in them romance or naughtiness lacking in the native words. The earliest is Middle English amorette (c. 1400, from Old French amorete "sweetheart, amorous girl"), which was obsolete by 17c. but revived or reborrowed 1825 as amourette "petty love affair." Also amorado (c. 1600, from Spanish), amoroso (1610s, Italian), and compare Amaretto. The words were applied as well to love sonnets, love-knots, amorous glances, little cupids, etc. 

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dalliance (n.)

also daliance, mid-14c., daliaunce "edifying or spiritual conversation," from dally + -ance. Probably formed in Anglo-French but not attested there. From late 14c. as "polite conversation, chat, small talk; amorous talk, flirtation, coquetry;" meaning "idle or frivolous activity" is from 1540s.

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raddle (v.)

"color coarsely with red or rouge," 1630s, from raddle (n.) "red ochre used as paint, layer of red pigment" (mid-14c.), fromrad, a variant of red. Related: Raddled, raddling.

                     As it were to dream of
morticians' daughters raddled but amorous
[Pound, from Canto LXXIV]
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merry widow 

"amorous or designing widow," 1907, from the English title of Franz Lehar's operetta "Die Lustige Witwe" (1905). "The Lusty Widow" would have been more etymological (see lust (n.)), but would have given the wrong impression in English. Meaning "a type of wide-brimmed hat" (popularized in the play) is attested from 1908.

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smicker (adj.)

"elegant, fine, gay," Middle English smiker, from Old English smicere "neat, elegant, beautiful, fair, tasteful." Compare Old High German smehhar, Middle High German smieke, German Schminke "paint, makeup, rouge." Hence smicker (v.) "look amorously" at someone (1660s); smickering "an amorous inclination" (1690s).

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