Etymology
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African-American (adj.)

there are isolated instances from the late 18th and early 19th centuries, but the modern use is a re-invention first attested 1969 (in reference to the African-American Teachers Association) which became the preferred term in some circles for "U.S. black" (noun or adjective) by the late 1980s. See African + American. Mencken, 1921, reports Aframerican "is now very commonly used in the Negro press." Afro-American is attested in 1853, in freemen's publications in Canada. Africo-American (1817 as a noun, 1826 as an adjective) was common in abolitionist and colonization society writings.

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all-American (n.)

1888, plural, as the name of a barnstorming baseball team composed of players from various teams across the United States. From all + American.

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Anglo-Indian (adj.)

1814, "pertaining to the English who settled in India," from Anglo- + Indian.

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travois (n.)

type of American Indian transport, 1847, said to be ultimately from a Canadian Indian pronunciation of travail.

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dory (n.1)

"small, flat-bottomed boat," especially one sent out from a larger vessel to catch fish, 1709, American English, perhaps from a West Indian or Central American Indian language.

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Guarani (n.)

South American Indian language, 1797, from a native word.

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geoduck (n.)

edible Pacific clam, 1883, perhaps from an American Indian word.

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cayuse (n.)

"horse, Indian pony of the northern Rockies," 1841, American English, said to be a Chinook (native Pacific Northwest) word; also the name of an Indian group and language (1825); of unknown origin.

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redskin (n.)

"North American Indian," 1690s, from red (adj.1) + skin (n.). "(Not the preferred term.)" [OED]. Red as the skin color of Native Americans is from 1580s; red man "North American Indian" is from 1580s.

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Crow 

Indian tribe of the American Midwest, the name is a rough translation of their own name, Apsaruke.

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