Etymology
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amenableness (n.)

"liability to answer, disposition to respond to," 1830, from amenable + -ness.

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amenable (adj.)

1590s, "liable to make answer or defense, accountable," from Anglo-French amenable, from Old French amener "bring, take, conduct, lead" (to the law), from "to" (see ad-) + mener "to lead," from Latin minare "to drive (cattle) with shouts," variant of minari "to threaten," also "to jut, project" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project"). Sense of "tractable" is from 1803, from notion of "disposed to answer or submit to influence." Related: Amenably.

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amend (v.)
early 13c., "to free from faults, rectify," from Old French amender "correct, set right, make better, improve" (12c.), from Latin emendare "to correct, free from fault," from ex "out" (see ex-) + menda "fault, blemish," from PIE root *mend- "physical defect, fault" (source also of Sanskrit minda "physical blemish," Old Irish mennar "stain, blemish," Welsh mann "sign, mark").

The spelling with a- is unusual but early and also is found in Provençal and Italian. In English it has been supplanted in senses of "repair; cure" by its shortened offspring mend (v.). Meaning "to add to legislation" (ostensibly to correct or improve it) is recorded from 1777. Related: Amended; amending.
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amenity (n.)
late 14c., "quality of being pleasant or agreeable," from Latin amoenitatem (nominative amoenitas) "delightfulness, pleasantness," from amoenus "pleasant," which is perhaps related to amare "to love" (see Amy).
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ament (n.)
"person born an idiot," 1894, from Latin amentia "madness," from amentem "mad," from a for ab "away from" (see a- (2)) + mentem "mind," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think."
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