Etymology
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checker (v.)

"to ornament with a checked or checkered design, decorate with squares of alternate color," late 14c. (implied in checkered), from Old French eschequeré and from checker (n.1). Related: Checkering.

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stichomythia (n.)
"dialogue in alternate lines," Latinized from Greek stikhomythia, from stikhos (see stichic) + mythos "speech, talk" (see myth) + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Stichomythic.
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interchange (n.)
early 15c., "an exchange, act of exchanging reciprocally," from Old French entrechange, from entrechangier (see interchange (v.)). Meaning "alternate succession" is from 1550s. In reference to a type of road junction, 1944.
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interchange (v.)
late 14c., enterchaungen, "to give and receive reciprocally; to alternate, put each in place of the other" (trans.), also "change reciprocally" (intrans.), from Old French entrechangier "interchange, exchange," from entre- "between" (see inter-) + changier "to change" (see change (v.)). Related: Interchanged; interchanging.
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alternation (n.)

mid-15c., from Old French alternacion "alternation," from Latin alternationem (nominative alternatio) "an interchanging," noun of action from past-participle stem of alternare "to do first one thing then the other; exchange parts," from alternus "one after the other, alternate, in turns, reciprocal," from alter "the other" (see alter).

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parallax (n.)

"apparent displacement of an object observed, due to an actual displacement of the observer," 1570s, from French parallaxe (mid-16c.), from Greek parallaxis "change, alteration, inclination of two lines meeting at an angle," from parallassein "to alter, make things alternate," from para- (see para- (1)) + allassein "to change," from allos "other" (from PIE root *al- "beyond"). Related: Parallactic.

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quarterly (adv.)

early 15c., quarterli, "four times a year, once a quarter," from quarter (n.1) + -ly (2). As an adjective from mid-15c., "occupying alternate quarters" (of a coat of arms), with -ly (1). As a noun, "a quarterly publication," from 1830, from the adjective. Earlier the adverb was used in a now-obsolete sense of "into quarters" (c. 1400).

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alternative (n.)
1620s, in rhetoric, "proposition involving two statements, the acceptance of one implying the rejection of the other," from noun use of Medieval Latin alternativus "do one thing and then another, do by turns," from Latin alternus "one after the other, alternate, in turns, reciprocal," from alter "the other" (see alter). Of courses of action, from 1814. Of objects, etc., "the other of two which may be chosen," by 1836.
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interlard (v.)
early 15c., "to mix with alternate layers of fat" (before cooking), from Old French entrelarder (12c.), from entre- "between" (see inter-) + larder "to lard," from Old French lard "bacon fat" (see lard (n.)). Figurative sense of "diversify with something intermixed" first recorded 1560s. Related: Interlarded; interlarding; interlardment.
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supprise (n.)
mid-15c., "injury, wrong, outrage," from supprise (v.) "overpower, subdue, put down; grieve, afflict" (c. 1400), also "take unawares, attack unexpectedly" (mid-15c.), from Anglo-French supprise, fem. past participle of supprendre, variant of sorprendre (see surprise (n.)). The noun later also had sense "oppression; surprise attack," but perhaps originally was an alternate form of surprise used in a specific sense.
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