Etymology
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abecedary (n.)
"primer, alphabet table," mid-15c., from Medieval Latin abecedarium "an ABC book," neuter of adjective abecedarius, used as a noun, from the first four letters of the Latin alphabet. Abecedarian (adj.) is attested from 1660s.
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zeta (n.)
sixth letter of the Greek alphabet; see zed.
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phi 
twenty-first letter of the Greek alphabet; see ph.
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al Qaeda 
alternative Latin alphabet transliteration of Arabic al Qaida (q.v.).
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yod (n.)
10th and smallest letter of the Hebrew alphabet (compare jot, iota).
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chirology (n.)

"art or practice of finger-spelling, use of the manual alphabet," 1650s, from chiro- "hand" + -logy "a speaking."

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psi (n.)

23rd letter of the Greek alphabet. Its use for "psychic force, paranormal phenomenon" dates from 1942 (probably from psychic (adj.)).

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kappa 
tenth letter of the Greek alphabet, c. 1400, from an Aramaized form of Hebrew qoph; see K.
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Braille (n., adj.)

"system of embossed printing used as an alphabet for the blind," 1853, from Louis Braille, French musician and teacher, blind from age 3, who devised it c. 1830.

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digamma (n.)

1550s, "the letter F;" 1690s as the name of a former letter in the Greek alphabet, corresponding to -F- (apparently originally pronounced with the force of English consonantal -w-), from Latin digamma "F," from Greek digamma, literally "double gamma" (because it resembles two gammas, one atop the other). The sixth letter of the original Greek alphabet, it corresponded to Semitic waw.

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