Etymology
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dominical (adj.)

1550s, "of or pertaining to Christ as Lord;" 1620s, "of or pertaining to Sunday (as the Lord's day)," from Medieval Latin dominicalis, "pertaining to Sunday; pertaining to the Lord," from Latin dominicus, from dominus "lord,"  from domus "house" (from PIE root *dem- "house, household").

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ley (n.)
"line of a prehistoric track; alignment of natural and artificial features," 1922 [Alfred Watkins], apparently a variant of lea. Popular topic in Britain in 1920s-30s and again 1960s-70s.
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Third World (n.)
1963, from French tiers monde, formulated 1952 by French economic historian Alfred Sauvy (1898-1990) on model of the third estate (French tiers état) of Revolutionary France; his first world (The West) and second world (the Soviet bloc) never caught on.
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hospodar (n.)

former title of appointed Ottoman governors of Moldavia and Wallachia, 1680s, from Old Church Slavonic gospodi "lord, master," literally "lord of strangers," from gosti "guest, friend," from PIE *ghostis- "stranger" (from root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host"); second element from PIE root *poti- "powerful; lord." Compare host (n.1).

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forgetful (adj.)
late 14c., from forget + -ful. A curious formation. Used in the sense "causing forgetting" from 1550s, but almost exclusively in poetry (Milton, Tennyson, etc.). An older word in this sense was Middle English forgetel, from Old English forgitel "forgetful," from a formation similar to that in Dutch vergetel. Related: Forgetfully; forgetfulness.
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Dominic 

masc. proper name, Italian and Late Latin, from Latin dominicus "Lordly, devoted to God," literally "pertaining to a lord," from dominus "lord, master," from domus "house" (from PIE root *dem- "house, household").

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liege (n.)
late 14c., "vassal of a feudal lord," also "a feudal sovereign, a liege-lord," probably from liege (adj.)) or from a noun use of the adjective in Old French or Anglo-French. A fully reciprocal relationship, so the adjective could apply to either party. Old French distinguished them as lige seignur "liege-lord" and home lige "liege-man."
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Pangaea 

"supercontinent of the late Paleozoic era," 1924, from Greek pan- "all" (see pan-) + gaia "earth" (see Gaia). First attested in German, 1920, in Alfred Wegener's "Die Entstehung der Kontinente und Ozeane" (but according to OED the word is not found in 1914 first edition).

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laird (n.)
"landed proprietor or hereditary estate-holder in Scotland," mid-15c. (mid-13c. as a surname), Scottish and northern England dialectal variant of lord, from Middle English laverd (see lord (n.)). Related: Lairdship.
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Frey 
god of the earth's fruitfulness in Norse mythology, from Old Norse frey "lord," from Proto-Germanic *frawan "lord," from suffixed form of PIE *pro-, from root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before, first, chief."
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