Etymology
Advertisement
brewer (n.)
"one who brews, craftsman who brews and sells ale or beer," c. 1300 (as a surname from c. 1200), agent noun from brew (v.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
egg-nog (n.)

also eggnog, "sweet, rich, and stimulating cold drink made of eggs, milk, sugar, and spirits," c. 1775, American English, from egg (n.) + nog "strong ale."

Related entries & more 
Connor 

masc. proper name, little used in U.S. before 1980; in the top 100 names given to boys from 1992; apparently an alteration and appropriation of the surname Conner (13c.), representing Old English cunnere "examiner, inspector" (as in ale-conner; see con (v.3)).

Related entries & more 
shebeen (n.)
"cabin where unlicensed liquor is sold and drunk," 1781, chiefly in Ireland and Scotland, from Irish seibin "small mug," also "bad ale," diminutive of seibe "mug, bottle, liquid measure." The word immigrated and persisted in South African and West Indian English.
Related entries & more 
porter-house (n.)

also porterhouse, "restaurant or chophouse where porter, ale, and other malt liquors are sold or served," 1754, from porter (n.3) + house (n.). Porterhouse steak, consisting of a choice cut of beef between the sirloin and the tenderloin (1841) is said to be from a particular establishment in New York City.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
brewster (n.)
"one who makes and sells ale, a brewer," early 14c. (early 13c. as a surname), probably originally "a female brewer" (though most of the early surnames on the records are of men), from brew (v.) + -ster. Compare Old French braceresse, Medieval Latin brasiatrix "female brewer," and Clarice le Breweres on the 1312 Colchester Borough Court Rolls.
Related entries & more 
noggin (n.)

1620s, "small cup, mug," later of the contents of such a vessel, "small drink" (1690s), a word of unknown origin, possibly related to Norfolk dialectal nog "strong ale." OED considers that the similar Celtic words are "no doubt" from English. Informal meaning "head" is attested by 1866 in American English.

Related entries & more 
merry-go-round (n.)

"a revolving machine consisting of wooden horses or seats mounted on a circular platform," 1729, from merry (adj.) + go-round. Figurative use by 1838. Merry-totter (mid-15c.) was a Middle English name for a swing or see-saw. Also compare merry-go-down "strong ale" (c. 1500); merry-go-sorry "a mix of joy and sorrow" (1590s).

Related entries & more 
nappy (adj.)

"downy, having an abundance of nap on the surface," c. 1500, noppi, from nap (n.1) + -y (2). Earlier, of ale, "having a head, foamy" (mid-15c.), hence, in slang, "slightly intoxicated" (1721). Meaning "fuzzy, kinky," especially used in colloquial or derogatory reference to the hair of black people, is by 1840. It also was used of sheep. Related: Nappiness.

Related entries & more 
butt (n.2)
"liquor barrel, cask for wine or ale," late 14c., from Anglo-French but and Old French bot "barrel, wine-skin" (14c., Modern French botte), from Late Latin buttis "cask" (see bottle (n.)). Cognate with Spanish and Portuguese bota, Italian botte. Usually a cask holding 108 to 140 gallons, or roughly two hogsheads; at one time a butt was a legal measure, but it varied greatly and the subject is a complicated one (see notes in Century Dictionary).
Related entries & more 

Page 2