Etymology
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subsidy (n.)
late 14c., from Anglo-French subsidie, Old French subside "help, aid, assistance, contribution," from Latin subsidium "a help, aid, assistance, (military) reinforcements, troops in reserve," from subsidere "to settle down, stay, remain" (see subside).
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self-begotten (adj.)

"generated without aid of another," 1670s (Milton); see self- + begotten.

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Ophelia 

fem. proper name, from Greek opheleia "help, aid," from ophelein "to help, aid, assist," ophelos "advantage, help," from PIE root *obhel- "to avail" (source also of Armenian avelum "increase, abound").

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orienteering (n.)

in reference to the competitive sport of finding one's way in the wild with the aid of a map and a compass, 1948, from orient (v.).

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helping (n.)
"aid, assistance," late 13c., verbal noun from help (v.). Meaning "act of serving food" is from 1824; that of "a portion of food" is from 1883.
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resort (v.)

c. 1400, resorten, "advance, proceed; come or go; return (to a subject or topic); go to (someone) for aid, turn to for protection, mercy, etc.," from Old French resortir "recourse, appeal" (Modern French ressortir), from resort "resource, a help, an aid" (see resort (n.)). Related: Resorted; resorting.

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resort (n.)

late 14c., "that to which one has recourse for aid or assistance, source of comfort and solace," from Old French resort "resource, a help, an aid, a remedy," back-formation from resortir "to resort," literally "to go out again," from re- "again" (see re-) + sortir "go out" (see sortie).

The meaning "place people go for recreation" is recorded by 1754. Phrase in the last resort "ultimately" (1670s) translates French en dernier ressort, originally a last court of legal appeals.

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compress (n.)

1590s in the surgical sense of "soft mass of linen or other cloth to press against some part of the body (with the aid of a bandage)," from compress (v.).

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assistance (n.)
early 15c., "act of helping or aiding; help given, aid," from Old French assistance and Medieval Latin assistentia, from the respective verbs (see assist (v.)).
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self-sufficient (adj.)

"able to supply one's own needs, capable of fulfilling one's own desires without aid of others," 1580s, from self- + sufficient. Related: Self-sufficiently. Self-sufficing (1680s) is properly "sufficient for oneself."

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