Etymology
Advertisement
affection (n.)

c. 1200, affeccioun, "desire, inclination, wish, intention;" mid-14c., "an emotion of the mind, passion, lust as opposed to reason;" from Old French afection (12c., Modern French affection) "emotion, inclination, disposition; love, attraction, enthusiasm," from Latin affectionem (nominative affectio) "a relation, disposition; a temporary state; a frame, constitution," noun of state from past-participle stem of afficere "to do something to, act on," from ad "to" (see ad-) + facere (past participle factus) "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

Sense developed in Latin from "disposition" to "good disposition, zealous attachment." In English the sense of "love" is from late 14c. Formally it goes with affect (v.2), but it has absorbed some sense from (v.1). Related: Affections.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
*dhe- 

*dhē-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to set, put."

It forms all or part of: abdomen; abscond; affair; affect (v.1) "make a mental impression on;" affect (v.2) "make a pretense of;" affection; amplify; anathema; antithesis; apothecary; artifact; artifice; beatific; benefice; beneficence; beneficial; benefit; bibliothec; bodega; boutique; certify; chafe; chauffeur; comfit; condiment; confection; confetti; counterfeit; deed; deem; deface; defeasance; defeat; defect; deficient; difficulty; dignify; discomfit; do (v.); doom; -dom; duma; edifice; edify; efface; effect; efficacious; efficient; epithet; facade; face; facet; facial; -facient; facile; facilitate; facsimile; fact; faction (n.1) "political party;" -faction; factitious; factitive; factor; factory; factotum; faculty; fashion; feasible; feat; feature; feckless; fetish; -fic; fordo; forfeit; -fy; gratify; hacienda; hypothecate; hypothesis; incondite; indeed; infect; justify; malefactor; malfeasance; manufacture; metathesis; misfeasance; modify; mollify; multifarious; notify; nullify; office; officinal; omnifarious; orifice; parenthesis; perfect; petrify; pluperfect; pontifex; prefect; prima facie; proficient; profit; prosthesis; prothesis; purdah; putrefy; qualify; rarefy; recondite; rectify; refectory; sacrifice; salmagundi; samadhi; satisfy; sconce; suffice; sufficient; surface; surfeit; synthesis; tay; ticking (n.); theco-; thematic; theme; thesis; verify.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit dadhati "puts, places;" Avestan dadaiti "he puts;" Old Persian ada "he made;" Hittite dai- "to place;" Greek tithenai "to put, set, place;" Latin facere "to make, do; perform; bring about;" Lithuanian dėti "to put;" Polish dziać się "to be happening;" Russian delat' "to do;" Old High German tuon, German tun, Old English don "to do."

Related entries & more 
psychoactive (adj.)

also psycho-active, "of or pertaining to drugs that affect mental states," 1959, from psycho- + active.

Related entries & more 
besot (v.)
"affect with a foolish manifestation," 1570s, from be- + sot. Related: Besotted; besotting.
Related entries & more 
jaundice (v.)
"to affect with prejudice or envy," 1791, but usually in figurative use. Related: Jaundiced.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
psychotropic (adj.)

"affecting a person's mental state," especially "of or pertaining to drugs that affect mental states," 1956, from psycho- + -tropic, from Greek tropos "a turning," from trepein "to turn" (from PIE root *trep- "to turn"). Hence, what "turns" the mind.

Related entries & more 
dark-room (n.)

also darkroom, in photography, "room from which any light that would affect a photographic plate or film has been excluded," 1841, from dark (adj.) + room (n.).

Related entries & more 
turbulence (n.)
early 15c., from Late Latin turbulentia "trouble, disquiet," from Latin turbulentus (see turbulent). In reference to atmospheric eddies that affect airplanes, by 1918. Related: Turbulency.
Related entries & more 
embitter (v.)

"make bitter," c. 1600, from em- (1) + bitter (adj.). Now rare in its literal sense; figurative meaning "affect with bitterness or unhappiness" is attested by 1630s. Related: Embittered; embitterment.

Related entries & more 
delight (v.)
Origin and meaning of delight

c. 1200, deliten, intransitive, "to have or take great pleasure;" c. 1300, transitive, "to affect with great pleasure," from Old French delitier "please greatly, charm," from Latin delectare "to allure, delight, charm, please," frequentative of delicere "entice" (see delicious). Related: Delighted; delighting.

Related entries & more 

Page 2