Etymology
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bum (adj.)
"of poor quality," 1859, American English, from bum (n.2). Bum steer in figurative sense of "bad advice" attested from 1901.
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advisable (adj.)
1640s, "prudent, expedient," from advise (v.) + -able (q.v.). It also can mean "open to advice" (1660s), but this is rare.
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Ethelred 

Anglo-Saxon masc. given name, Old English Æðelræd, literally "noble counsel," from æðele "noble" (see atheling) + ræd, red "advice" (see rede).

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counselor (n.)

mid-13c., counseiler, "one who gives counsel or advice, a confidante," from Old French conseillier "counselor, adviser" (Modern French conseiller), from Latin consilator, agent noun from consiliare, from consilium (see counsel (v.)).

Also sometimes counsellor, but the double -l- is unetymological and perhaps is modeled on chancellor. Meaning "one who gives professional legal advice, a counseling lawyer," is from 1530s. Psychological sense (as in marriage counselor, is from 1940).

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counsel (n.)

c. 1200, "advice or instruction given;" c. 1300, "mutual advising or interchange of opinions, consultation," from Old French counseil "advice, counsel; deliberation, thought" (10c.), from Latin consilium "plan, opinion," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + root of calare "to announce, summon" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). As a synonym for "lawyer, one who gives legal counsel," attested late 14c.

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Eldred 

masc. proper name, from Old English Ealdred, literally "great in counsel," from eald "old; great" (from PIE root *al- (2) "to grow, nourish") + ræd "advice, counsel" (see rede).

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dissuasion (n.)

early 15c., dissuasioun, "advice or exhortation in opposition to something," from Old French dissuasion (14c.) and directly from Latin dissuasionem (nominative dissuasio) "an advice to the contrary," noun of action from past-participle stem of dissuadere "to advise against, oppose by argument," from dis- "off, against" (see dis-) + suadere "to urge, incite, promote, advise, persuade," literally "recommend as good" (related to suavis "sweet"), from PIE root *swād- "sweet, pleasant" (see sweet (adj.)).

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silver bullet (n.)
"very effective, almost magical remedy," 1808. The belief in the magical power of silver weapons to conquer foes goes back at least to ancient Greece (as in Delphic Oracle's advice to Philip of Macedon).
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counseling (n.)

also counselling, early 14c., "the giving or taking of counsel," verbal noun from counsel (v.). Meaning "the giving of professional advice on social or psychological problems" is attested by 1928. 

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jurisconsult (n.)
"one who gives his opinion in cases of law," c. 1600, from Latin iurisconsultus, originally two words, genitive of ius "law" (see jurist) + present participle of consultare "consult, take the advice of" (see consultation).
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