Etymology
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teaser (n.)
"one who teases" (wool, flax, etc.), late 15c. (late 13c. as a surname), agent noun from tease (v.). From 1934 as "short sample, introductory advertisement."
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drive-through (adj.)

"that may be used or experienced while driving a car," 1949 (in an advertisement for the Beer Vault Drive-Thru in Ann Arbor, Michigan), from the verbal phrase; see drive (v.) + through (adv.).

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post (v.1)

"to affix (a paper notice, advertisement, etc.) to a post" (in a public place), hence, "to make known, to bring before the public," 1630s, from post (n.1). The meaning "to achieve" (a score, a victory) appears to have begin in U.S. newspaper sports-writing, by 1949. Related: Posted; posting.

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fixer (n.)
1849, of chemicals, etc.; 1885 as a person who "makes things right;" agent noun from fix (v.). Fixer-upper is from 1967 as "that which repairs other things" (in an advertisement for a glue); by 1976 as a real-estate euphemism for "property that needs a lot of work."
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jingle (n.)
"tinkling or clinging sound," such as made by small bells, 1590s, from jingle (v.). Meaning "something that jingles" is from 1610s, especially "metallic disc on a tambourine." Meaning "song in an advertisement" first attested 1930, from earlier sense of "catchy array of words in prose or verse" (1640s).
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salesperson (n.)

by 1875; see sales + person. Generally intended to apply to persons of either sex, when it wasn't a blind swerve away from vulgar saleswoman or saleslady.

WANTED, an experienced LADY ASSISTANT, good salesperson, for a Bookseller's and Stationer's Shop, with Library. Permanent to a suitable person. Apply W. PORTER and SONS, Herald Office, Blackpool. [advertisement in The Bookseller, May 4, 1875] 
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kitchen sink (n.)

sink to wash food, dishes, etc., 1824. Phrase everything but (or and) the kitchen sink is attested from 1944, from World War II armed forces slang, in reference to intense bombardment.

Out for blood, our Navy throws everything but the kitchen sink at Jap vessels, warships and transports alike. [Shell fuel advertisement, Life magazine, Jan. 24, 1944]

Earlier was everything but the kitchen stove (1919).

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Pyrex (n.)

1915, proprietary name (Corning Glass Works, Corning, N.Y.) of a type of hard, heat-resistant glass, an arbitrary coinage, in which advertisement writers and eager etymologists see implications of Greek pyr "fire" and perhaps Latin rex "king;" but the prosaic inventors say it was based on pie (n.1), because pie dishes were among the first products made from it. The -r-, in that case, is purely euphonious.

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extended (adj.)

mid-15c., "occupying time, made longer," past-participle adjective from extend (v.). Meaning "stretched out" in space is from 1550s; extended-play (adj.), in reference to recordings (especially 7-inch, 45 rpm vinyl records) is from 1953; in reference to pinball games by 1943. Extended family (n.) in sociology recorded from 1942.

A challenging question was asked RCA engineers and scientists in 1951. How can we increase the playing time of a 7-inch record, without using a larger disc? Sixteen months of research gave the answer, "45 EP"—Extended Play. [Radio Corporation of America magazine advertisement, May 1953]
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corn-dog (n.)

"frankfurter dipped in cornmeal batter, fried, and served on a stick," 1949, American English; see corn (n.1) + hot dog. Said to have been introduced by Vaudeville performers Neil and Carl Fletcher in 1942 at the Texas State Fair.

Be the first to serve this delicious new sandwich. No special ingredients needed. Cooks 1 to 4 sandwiches at a time in 5 minutes. Costs only 5 ¢ each to make—sells for 15 ¢ to 20 ¢ apiece. Recipe and instructions shipped with oven. [advertisement for Dixie Corn Dog Ovens in The Billboard, Feb. 26, 1949]
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