Etymology
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acknowledge (v.)
late 15c., "admit or show one's knowledge," a blend of Middle English aknow "admit or show one's knowledge" (from Old English oncnawan "understand, come to recognize," from on (see on (prep.)) + cnawan "recognize;" see know) and Middle English knowlechen "admit, acknowledge" (c. 1200; see knowledge). "By 16th c. the earlier vbs. knowledge and a(c)know ... were obs., and acknowledge took their place" [OED].

In the merger, an unetymological -c- slipped in; perhaps the explanation is that when English kn- became a simple "n" sound, the -c- stepped up to preserve, in this word, the ancient "kn-" sound. Related: Acknowledged; acknowledging.
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incontrovertible (adj.)

"too clear or certain to admit of dispute or controversy," 1640s, from in- (1) "not" + controvertible (see controvert). Related: Incontrovertibly; incontrovertibility.

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embosom (v.)

"take into or hold in the bosom; hold in nearness or intimacy; admit to the heart or affections; cherish," 1580s, from em- (1) + bosom (n.).

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concede (v.)

1630s, "to make a concession of, yield up" (transitive), from French concéder or directly from Latin concedere "give way, yield, go away, depart, retire," figuratively "agree, consent, give precedence," from con-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see con-), + cedere "to go, grant, give way" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield").

From 1640s as "to admit as true." Intransitive sense "accept a disputed point, yield" is from 1780; especially "admit defeat" in an election (1824). Related: Conceded; conceding.

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indubitable (adj.)
mid-15c., "too plain to admit of doubt," from Latin indubitabilis "that cannot be doubted," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + dubitabilis "doubtful," from dubitare "hesitate, doubt" (see doubt (v.)).
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exclusive (adj.)
mid-15c., "so as to exclude;" 1560s, "that excludes," from Medieval Latin exclusivus, from exclus-, past participle stem of excludere (see exclude). Of monopolies, rights, franchises, etc., from 1760s; of social circles, clubs, etc., "unwilling to admit outsiders," from 1822. Related: Exclusively; exclusiveness.
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grantor (n.)
in legal language, "person who makes a grant or conveyance," 1620s, from Anglo-French grantor, Old French graanter agent noun from granter "give; agree, consent; admit; permit" (see grant (v.)). Native form granter (n.) is attested from c. 1400.
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studio (n.)
1819, "work-room of a sculptor or painter," usually one with windows to admit light from the sky, from Italian studio "room for study," from Latin studium (see study (v.)). Motion picture sense first recorded 1911; radio broadcasting sense 1922; television sense 1938. Studio apartment first recorded 1903.
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enfranchise (v.)
early 15c., "grant (someone) the status or privilege of citizenship, admit to membership in a town," from Old French enfranchiss-, present participle stem of enfranchir "to set or make free; grant a franchise to;" from en- "make, put in" (see en- (1)) + franc "free" (see franchise (n.)). Generally with reference to voting privileges after c. 1700. Related: Enfranchised; enfranchisement.
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assent (v.)
c. 1300, "agree to, approve;" late 14c. "admit as true," from Old French assentir "agree; get used to" (12c.), from Latin assentare/adsentare, frequentative of assentire "agree with, approve," from ad "to" (see ad-) + sentire "to feel, think" (see sense (n.)). Related: Assented; assenting.
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