Etymology
Advertisement
administrate (v.)
"manage or direct affairs," 1630s, from Latin administratus, past participle of administrare "manage, control, superintend" (see administer) or else a back-formation from administrator, administration. Related: Administrated; administrating.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
intoxication (n.)
c. 1400, intoxigacion "poisoning, administration of poison," from Medieval Latin intoxicationem (nominative intoxicatio) "a poisoning," noun of action from past participle stem of intoxicare "to poison" (see intoxicate). Meaning "state of inebriation" is from 1640s.
Related entries & more 
administrative (adj.)

"pertaining to administration, having to do with the managing of public affairs," 1731, from Latin administrativus, from administrat-, past-participle stem of administrare "to manage, control, superintend" (see administer). Related: Administratively.

Related entries & more 
jawbone (n.)
also jaw-bone, mid-15c., from jaw (n.) + bone (n.). Hence jawboning "lecturing, hectoring" (1966), a term associated with the U.S. presidential administration of Lyndon Johnson; compare jaw (v.).
Related entries & more 
misgovernment (n.)

late 14c., "want of self-restraint, misbehavior" (a sense now obsolete), from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + government. Meaning "bad government, management, or administration of public or private affairs" is from 1590s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
jurisdiction (n.)
early 14c., jurisdiccioun, jurediction, etc., "administration of justice," from Old French juridicion (13c., Modern French juridiction) and directly from Latin iurisdictionem (nominative iurisdictio) "administration of justice, jurisdiction," from phrase iuris dictio, genitive of ius "law, right" (see jurist) + dictio "a saying" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly").

Meaning "extent or range of administrative power, domain over which a legal or judicial authority extends" is from late 14c. Meaning "judicial authority, right of making and enforcing laws" is from early 15c. The form in English assimilated to Latin 16c. Related: Jurisdictional.
Related entries & more 
low-profile (adj.)
1957, in reference to automobile wheels, from low (adj.) + profile (n.). General sense is by 1970 in American English, apparently first in reference to Nixon Administration policy of partial U.S. disengagement from burdensome commitments abroad.
Related entries & more 
gulag (n.)
system of prisons and labor camps, especially for political detainees, in the former Soviet Union; rough acronym from Russian Glavnoe upravlenie ispravitel'no-trudovykh lagerei "Chief Administration of Corrective Labor Camps," set up in 1931.
Related entries & more 
self-government (n.)

1734, of persons, "self-control;" 1798, of states, nations, provinces, cities, etc., "administration of its own affairs without outside direction or interference," from self- + government. Related: Self-governing (1680s); self-governed (1709 as an adjective, of persons, "marked by self-control").

Related entries & more 
police (n.)
Origin and meaning of police

1530s, "the regulation and control of a community" (similar in sense to policy (n.1)); from Middle French police "organized government, civil administration" (late 15c.), from Latin politia "civil administration," from Greek polis "city" (see polis).

Until mid-19c. used in England for "civil administration;" application to "administration of public order, law-enforcement in a community" (1716) is from French (late 17c.), and originally in English referred to France or other foreign nations.

The sense of "an organized civil force for maintaining order, preventing and detecting crime, etc." is by 1800; the first force so-named in England was the Marine Police, set up 1798 to protect merchandise at the Port of London. Meaning "body of officers entrusted with the duty of enforcing laws, detecting crime, etc." is from 1810.

In its most common acceptation, the police signifies the administration of the municipal laws and regulations of a city or incorporated town or borough by a corps of administrative or executive officers, with the necessary magistrates for the immediate use of force in compelling obedience and punishing violation of the laws, as distinguished from judicial remedies by action, etc. The primary object of the police system is the prevention of crime and the pursuit of offenders; but it is also subservient to other purposes, such as the suppression of mendicancy, the preservation of order, the removal of obstructions and nuisances, and the enforcing of those local and general laws which relate to the public health, order, safety, and comfort. [Century Dictionary, 1895]

In constitutional law, police power is the power of a government to limit civil liberties and exercise restraint and compulsion over private rights, especially to advance or protect the public welfare. Police state "state regulated by means of national police" first recorded 1865, with reference to Austria. Police action in the international sense of "military intervention short of war, ostensibly to correct lawlessness" is from 1933. Police officer is attested from 1794, American English. Police station is from 1817. Police dog is by 1908.

Related entries & more 

Page 2